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Archive for May, 2010

Dear Local Gourmands,

I stopped by the humming Greenpoint Food Market on Saturday to visit my vendor friends and check out who else has joined the ranks of Brooklyn’s homespun food entrepreneurs– the very folks who are making a new name for Brooklyn with their DIY labels to go along with the kimchi, kraut, chutney, and chocolates that they bring forth from midnight kitchens in Long Island City, or restaurants in the off hours. There was Liz serving up her famous southern biscuits, across the way Laena’s Anarchy in a Jar jam was getting gobbled up, just next door Mama O’s Kimchi was rocking right along, and over yonder Annie’s rooftop produce was strutting its stuff. I wound my way between the tables of cookies and cupcakes, the pork buns and truffles, then grabbed a ginger soda and headed out to take respite in McGolrick Park’s rose garden. There I ran into an old girlfriend from college who had come to check out the market and see where she might fit in: she and her friend Joshua have an idea for tomato sauce. We talked over the prospect of homemade ketchup and mused about when the first tomatoes will be ready to eat. I told her I’d gladly taste test any time, then wandered on, just as happy to see the local food circle ever expanding as I was to imagine how I’ll cook with her special sauce.

Keep dreaming,
Jeanne

Through 10pm, Wednesday May 27
New Amsterdam Market’s Purveyors’ Auction
Bid on-line
If you weren’t able to make it to the New Amsterdam Market’s City of Merchants party last Saturday, there is still time to bid on the Purveyors’ Auction which celebrates the art of hand crafting objects. “Whether you are drawn to learning from seasoned experts how to craft traditional foods, or hosting a meal served in the good company of farmers and producers, we appreciate your kind support in bidding for these fine items and experiences, most of which have been uniquely developed for New Amsterdam Market. If you have any questions about the listed items please email:auction@newamsterdammarket.org.” New Amsterdam Market begins its 2010 season down at the old seaport on Sunday, June 27.

Tuesday, May 25, 7-9pm
Spring Harvest Cooking Demo with Chef Peter Berley
Whole Foods Bowery Culinary Center
95 East Houston Street 
Tickets, $25
In this workshop, Peter Berley, former executive chef of Angelica’s Kitchen, showcases the fine flavors of spring’s first harvest. Learn some new techniques to get the most out of the season’s sweet offerings– strawberries, early greens, peas, radishes, and fresh herbs– and behold first fresh tastes of 2010.

Tuesday, May 25, 6-8pm
Mycoascaping: Mushrooms in the Urban Landscape
 
The Commons
388 Atlantic Ave.

Learn how to incorporate fungi into your fire escape containers or your backyard garden and how to reap the benefits of this nutritious and medicinal food. This workshop explores the basics of mushroom cultivation as well as methods for preparing your harvest in a holistic way, with an eye to the ecological and health benefits that fungi have to offer.

Wednesday, May 26 and Thursday, May 27, 9am-4pm 
Liberation Ecology: Permaculture and Power with Rafter Sass
The Commons
388 Atlantic Ave Brooklyn
$40-75 sliding scale 

“What would “sustainability” look like, if it refused to sustain racism? What could “liberation” look like in a society headed for ecological collapse? In this two-day experiential workshop, participants develop answers to these questions in an environment of collaboration, experiment, and wrestling with some hard questions. Design projects, the Daylighting Exercises, presentation, and facilitated discussion, help participants draw new maps of our situation, and chart new paths for their own work, forward to a truly sustainable society.”

 Thursday, May 27, 7-9pm
Sip ‘n’ Slurp with Widow’s Hole Oyster Co.
Pasanella and Sons
115 South St.
Tickets, $45
Michael Osinski of Long Island’s Widow’s Hole Oyster Co. serves up local bivalves with a bit of history on Manhattan’s favorite seaside snack and teaches participants how to shuck their own while Pasanella and Sons’ wine director Ryan Ibsen pours wine to match. (I’d perk my ears if I were you, because I have a hunch the city is going to be rife with shuck offs in the weeks and months to come.) 

Saturday, May 29, 7pm
5 Courses are 5 Dances
With GoGoGoat and Les Salonniers

Gramercy Loft
112 E. 19th St.
Tickets, $60

GoGoVertigoat Dance and/or Performance and Les Salonnieres collaborate with Chef Jacques Gautier of Park Slope’s Palo Santo to present five courses of locally sourced fare, each paired with a dance. 
_________________________________
Of note a few weeks down the road…

Monday, June 7, 6pm
Dinner at Roman’s to Support 
51 Saint Edwards Street School Garden
243 DeKalb Ave., Fort Greene
Tickets, $75
If you haven’t had a chance to pile into Roman’s, the recent neighborhood addition brought to DeKalb’s restaurant row by Andrew Tarlow and Mark Firth of Marlow and Sons and Diner, then consider this your invitation to party. This Monday they’ll devote their locally sourced menu to a benefit dinner to raise some money for creation of the 51 Saint Edwards Street School Garden.

Tuesday, June 8, 6:30-9pm
An Evening of Wild Fermentation with Sandor Katz
Judson Memorial Church
Assembly Hall
239 Thompson St.
Tickets, $30
Sandor Katz, the present-day father of fermentation, spreads the gospel on how to make your own sauerkraut, kimchi, pickles, kefir, and other fermented delicacies in this workshop to benefit Just Food.  Katz will speak to the healing qualities and nutritional importance of live-culture ferments, as well as their illustrious history and integral role in human cultural evolution. Equip yourself Katz’ simple techniques for fermenting these healthful foods in your home, and be part of the fermentation sensation.

Friday, June 11, 5-8pm
The Southern Foodways Alliance: Potlikker Film Fest NYC
Hill Country Barbecue Market
30 W. 26th St.
Tickets, $55
The Southern Foodways Alliance is going to be in town for the Big Apple Barbecue, but you can catch up with these fine folks before the madness ensues at Hill Country for films and food. Three documentaries directed by SFA’s Joe York will be on view including the premier of Cut/ Chop/Cook, an homage to the Scott family of pitmasters, from Hemingway, South Carolina, underwritten by the Union Square Hospitality Group. Chow down on catfish tamales with “comeback tartar sauce,” Chow-Chowed Kewpie Q with Grits, French Onion Fried Pig Ears, and Sock Sausage with Sweet Potato Biscuits — from John Currence, of City Grocery, Oxford, MS; Ashley Christensen of Poole’s Diner, Raleigh NC; Tyler Brown of Capitol Grille, Nashville, TN; and Elizabeth Karmel, a Southerner herself, now smoking cows and pigs at Hill Country Barbecue Market. Drink will be courtesy of Lazy Magnolia Brewing of Mississippi and Mountain Valley Spring Water of Arkansas. One Ring Zero, the Brooklyn-based collective, will provide interstitial musical moments, including a song composed just for this event, wherein Michael Hearst sings, with Theremin accompaniment, Ashley Christensen’s recipe for Chow-Chowed Kewpie Q with Grits. 

Saturday, June 12, 1-5pm
Pie Lovers Unite!

Benefit for BK Farmyards
Jimmy’s No. 43
43 E. 7th St.

$20 at the door
Remember the madness that ensued back in January when over 60 pies lined up for inspection on the judges table at the pie party for BK Farmyards? Since then, the organization’s Youth Farm at the High School for Public Service has transformed from a lawn to rows of produce, their egg CSA based in Imani Garden is ready to roll, and lucky for all the bakers in town, it’s time to trade in your mincemeat for strawberry and rhubarb. Join the reprise– come hungry and ready to hang with some of the city’s finest good food folk. A growing list of bakers follows:
Betty Brooklyn
Four & Twenty Blackbirds
First Prize Pies
Lily & Fig
SCRATCHbread
Growing Chefs / Eagle Street Rooftop Farm
Pie in the Park 
Brooklyn Honey
Jessica Morris
Joann Kim

Saturday, June 12, 11am-6pm
Brooklyn Botanic Garden Turns 100: 
Happy Bee-day! 
1000 Washington Ave.
*Free

“Celebrate BBG’s centennial with a bee-filled birthday party for all ages. Enjoy a day of musical performances by Stephane Wrembel, the Django Experiment; Mecca Bodega; the Persuasions; the Sweet Divines; and other artists. Themed walking tours with BBG’s gardeners and scientists highlight plants’ special relationships with bees. Sample “New York City rooftop honey” and other delights by local beekeepers and artisans. Hear renowned apiarist Dennis vanEngelsdorp and nature writer Verlyn Klinkenborg talk about the importance of bees in our environment. Kids can buzz around the grounds in fanciful bee costumes, make bee puppets, explore hands-on science workshops, and enjoy bee-inspired readings by Children’s Poet Laureate Mary Ann Hoberman.”

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Dear Local Gourmands,

I know you all read Mark Bittman anyway, but I am going to add my two cents and say that I put off all other obligations last night to stay in and try his recipe for rhubarb crisp, and I am here to report that you should do the same! Not too much sugar lets those vibrant stalks do the talking and the wonderfully buttery, sweet, pecan-laden topping do the rest. As he points out, strawberry rhubarb is an awesome combination, but the latter is available so much sooner than the former. Why not let rhubarb go it alone? I can’t resist buying more each time I hit the market. When not making crisp, I’ve been just cooking those stunning pink stalks down with a bit of lemon juice and honey to make a compote that is then spooned over yogurt for breakfast. The tartness is a tease, enjoyable like rainy days in spring.

All best,
Jeanne

Tuesday, May 18, 6:30pm
Last Call: The Rise and Fall of Prohibition
Tenement Museum
108 Orchard St.
RSVP here
Pulitzer Prize finalist Daniel Okrent speaks with Kevin Baker about the story of how Prohibition passed and what New York was like during those dry years. “Discover how a nation who knew alcohol to be cheaper than tea managed to relinquish their liquor for over ten years– and how many found it anyway in the underground world of bootlegging and speakeasies.”
Wednesday, May 19, 4-9pm
The Experimental Cuisine Collective Presents:
The Chemistry of Garlic and Onions
31 Washington Place, Rm 1003
*Free (but you must present a photo ID to enter)

NYU’s Chemistry Department hosts a seminar about the chemistry of the curious and all-important, multi-layered ingredients, garlic and onions.Reservations: experimentalcuisine.com.

Wednesday, May 19, 6-7pm
Karen Washington: Our Future, Our Food: The Role of Community Gardens in Urban Agriculture
20 West 44th Street, between 5th & 6th Avenues
Tickets, $25

Karen Washington, New York City’s venerable community gardener, gives a talk about the future of our food and the importance of community gardens in the development of urban agriculture.

Wednesday, May 19, 7-9pm
Sign up for Paisley Farm CSA
Jimmy’s No. 43
43 E. 7th St.
RSVP to 
lesliepariseau@gmail.com
If you haven’t had a chance to sign up for a CSA yet, hop over to Jimmy’s No. 43 where you can meet farmer Mike Kokas of Upstate Farms who will grow you an incredible bounty of produce over the season. He’s been supplying New York City’s restaurants for years, and why wouldn’t you want those quality vegetables for yourself? Meet the man behind the movment and enjoy one of Jimmy’s craft beers while you’re at it.

Wednesday, May 19, 7pm
Screening: Food Matters
Bushwick Food Coop
V Ultra Lounge
Suggested donation, $5
The Bushwick Food Coop continues to bring on the good food films, this time at V Ultra Lounge, where a screening of Food Matters will explore the health benefits of eating a balanced diet. A collection of interviews with leading nutritionists, naturopaths, scientists, M.D.s and medical journalists answer basic but vitally important questions about vitamins, whether or not organic is a better choice, natural treatments for lowering cholesterol, and foods that combat anxiety, depression, and even cancer.
Wednesday, May 19, 6pm
“I scream, you scream…”: The History of Ice Cream Making
Culinary Historians of New York in partnership with
Mount Vernon Hotel Museum
421 East 61st Street (in case of rain enter at #417)
Tickets
$40 Non-Members and Guests |
$25 CHNY/MVHM/LDEI/NYWCA Members |
$22 CHNY Student & Senior Members

Jeri Quinzio, IACP award-winning author of Sugar and Snow, delves into the history and evolution of one of summer’s best features: ice cream. From early sixteenth-century Europe to the American Good Humor truck, this delectable confection has been the delight of kings and kids worldwide. An ice cream social and tasting of artisanal ice creams will precede the lecture in a recreated 19th century Pleasure Garden.

Thursday, May 20, 6:30-8:30pm
Farmworkers’ Rights and Preserving Small Farms: A Conversation about the Farmworkers Fair Labor Practices ActDraesel Hall, Church of the Holy Trinity
316 East 88th St., btwn 1st & 2nd Aves
Tickets, $5-20 (No one will be turned away for lack of funds.)
“The farmworkers Fair Labor Practices Act is a New York State bill that was intended to provide fair labor protections to farmworkers who were excluded from the federal fair labor laws enacted in 1939. The legislation’s opponents have argued that, in its current form, the bill is not fair to smaller farms, which predominate in New York State. This forum will explore how the rights of farmworkers can be ensured without endangering the livelihoods of small farmers.”

Panelists include: Jody Bolluyt, farmer Roxbury Farm, policy committee member for NOFA-NY; Dr. Margaret Gray, Assistant Professor at Alelphi University, currently completing a book on Hudson Valley agriculture, food politics, and farmworkers; Lea Kone, assistant Director of NOFA-NY; Librada Paz, former farmworker for several decades and now farmworker advocate; Martin Rodriguez, famer/owner, Mimo Mex Farm; Reverend Richard Witt, Executive Director, Rural & Migrant Ministry.
Saturday, May 22, noon-5pm
Greenpoint Food Market
Church of the Messiah
129 Russell St., btwn Nassau & Driggs Ave., Greenpoint
The Greenpoint Food Market meets May with an enticing proposition: a picnic in the park. And who would turn that down? Pick up your fix of Brooklyn’s best pickles, kimchi, jam, truffles, chutney, etc. and then stroll over to McGolrick Park to oggle the good lookin’ crowd and fill up on your market munchies. Bring a blanket and a frisbee, and prepare for a performance by Raccoon Fighter at 3pm!

Saturday, May 22, 2-4pm
City of Merchants
New York Marble Cemetery
41 1/2 2nd Ave., East Village
Tickets, $25-$50
The wonderful public market that has taken over where the Fulton Fish Market left off, the New Amsterdam Market, won’t return to the stalls at the old seaport until June. In the meantime, join your merchant friends on the LES for an afternoon of cocktails and refreshments in the honor of the products and service they provide our community.

“City of Merchants is a celebration of the independent businesses who are restoring the health and vitality of our communities, urban and rural. Please stop by on the afternoon of May 22 for spirits, light refreshment and conversation at the New York Marble Cemetery, a hidden garden of the 19th century. The event will feature an exhibit of mercantile paper-works by Robert Warner, Master Printer; a silent auction of items manufactured in our region; and our first annual Toast to Merchants.”

Sunday, May 23, 2-3pm
Free workshop: Urban Chicken Keeping
Eagle St. Rooftop Farm
Eagle St., Greenpoint
Come out and volunteer all day at the farm, from 9am-4pm, as usual, and then sit in on a workshop on how to keep chickens in the city. Farmer Annie’s own birds will be there, and you should be too!

_________________________________
Of note a few weeks down the road…

Monday, May 24, 6:30-8:30pm
Room to Grow: Real Roles for City Residents & Food Professionals in Urban Agriculture
The Astor Center
399 Lafayette St.
Tickets, $20
“No one does food like New Yorkers. The restaurants and shops that prepare our food inspire worldwide food trends. But how much food does NYC require and where does it come from? How dependable is our food supply? How can urban residents produce more food and how will it make a difference if we do? How do we move from conversations to action? Join us for a lively discussion of Urban Agriculture in New York City. Presented by Farm Camp at Flying Pigs Farm and Astor Center.”

Monday, May 24, 6:30pm
Hungry Filmmakers
Anthology Film Archives
32 2nd Ave

“Hungry Filmmakers continues its tradition of showcasing excerpts or trailers from six upcoming or newly produced films that are hungry for wider audiences. Each filmmaker or a representative of the film will be in attendance for a lively Q&A which will be moderated on May 24th by Civil Eats editor Paula Crossfield. This third lineup of films expose further reasons to contemplate what we eat. From Michael Graziano’s urgent call for school lunch reform in Lunch Line, to George Langworthy and Maryam Henein’s enlightening connection between bees and food in Vanishing of the Bees, to Ginalola Lowry’s whimsical You Are What You Eat, each film clip will surely give audiences something to chew on.”

The complete lineup:
The Bering Sea: An Ecosystem in Crisis by Melissa Thompson
Vanishing of the Bees by George Langworthy and Maryam Henein
The Farmer and The Horse by Jared Flesher
Lunch Line by Michael Graziano
Pressure Cooker by Jennifer Grausman and Mark Becker
You Are What You Eat by Ginalola Lowry

Friday, June 11, 5-8pm
The Southern Foodways Alliance: Potlikker Film Fest NYC
Hill Country Barbecue Market
30 W. 26th St.
Tickets, $55
The Southern Foodways Alliance is going to be in town for the Big Apple Barbecue, but you can catch up with these fine folks before the madness ensues at Hill Country for films and food. Three documentaries directed by SFA’s Joe York will be on view including the premier of Cut/ Chop/Cook, an homage to the Scott family of pitmasters, from Hemingway, South Carolina, underwritten by the Union Square Hospitality Group. Chow down on catfish tamales with “comeback tartar sauce,” Chow-Chowed Kewpie Q with Grits, French Onion Fried Pig Ears, and Sock Sausage with Sweet Potato Biscuits — from John Currence, of City Grocery, Oxford, MS; Ashley Christensen of Poole’s Diner, Raleigh NC; Tyler Brown of Capitol Grille, Nashville, TN; and Elizabeth Karmel, a Southerner herself, now smoking cows and pigs at Hill Country Barbecue Market.
Drink will be courtesy of Lazy Magnolia Brewing of Mississippi and Mountain Valley Spring Water of Arkansas. One Ring Zero, the Brooklyn-based collective, will provide interstitial musical moments, including a song composed just for this event, wherein Michael Hearst sings, with Theremin accompaniment, Ashley Christensen’s recipe for Chow-Chowed Kewpie Q with Grits.

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Dear Local Gourmands,

I couldn’t be with my mom on Mother’s Day this year, which felt especially sad around dinner time– I knew my family out in Michigan was celebrating with a Sunday feast of grilled salmon and rhubarb pie. Alone in my kitchen in Brooklyn I decided the next best thing to do was at least invoke my relatives by making some of my great-grandmother Omi’s famous German potato salad. Her recipe, which calls for hardly any mayonnaise, benefits instead from a sauce of cider vinegar, peppercorns, and bay leaves which you simmer and then pour on to the still-hot cubes of potato. The dressing is soaked up, and then you add plenty of fresh dill and parsley, pickles (I used some of McClure’s fabulous relish) and just a dollop of mayo for good measure. When I was a kid and we made this for the buffet on Tuesday nights at my parent’s restaurant, or in later years when we brought it out for dinner parties on our back porch, I always loved the final touch– laying carefully cut rounds of hard boiled egg on top of the crest of potatoes. It is delicious, simple, comforting, and of course easy to make with ingredients that are available in the farmers market right now. Visit our shiny new website for Omi’s recipe, and be sure to share it with some dining companions who you really love.

Best,
Jeanne

Monday, May 10-Sunday, May 16
Pig Week
Jimmy’s No. 43
43 E. 7th St.

It’s Pig Week at Jimmy’s No. 43, and the East Village gastropub lauded for its incredible selection of brews and menu featuring local ingredients (this week heritage pork from the Piggery will be featured) wouldn’t let it pass without just fanfare. See the line up below and jimmysno43.com for more info. Tickets are available online or by phone: 212.982.3006.

May 11, 6:30-8:30pm ($35): Bacon, cheese, chocolate, and beer pairing hosted by Josh Ozersky and the New York Degustation Advisory Team.
May 12: Local charcuterie and beer pairings featured a la carte on the menu.
May 13, 7:30-9:30pm ($10): “Meat” the Farmer– Just Food and Jimmy’s No. 43 present an
Informational Q & A with Mike Yezzi of Flying Pigs Farm. Learn how pig farms work, hear anecdotes, and hang out with the farmer. (All proceeds will benefit Just Food and Flying
Pigs Farm.)

Tuesday, May 11, 7:30pm
Food for Thought: Hunger in NYC
Manhattan Young Democrats and Inequality Bites Supper Club
Middle Collegiate Church located at 7th St btwn 1st & 2nd Aves.
Tickets, $25
The Manhattan Young Democrats and Inequality Bites Supper Club team up to address the issues of food insecurity in New York City, one of the wealthiest cities in the world, and where access to food is still more tenuous than many of us realize. Come to the table to find out if you’ll get a lot to eat, or a little, and let the facts surprise you as an expert on hunger discusses residents’ lack of access to food. All proceeds will benefit New Alternatives for Homeless LGBT Youth and City Harvest.

Tuesday, May 11, 7-9pm
Screening: Black Gold
Tea Lounge
837 Union St., Park Slope
Crop to Cup Coffee’s co-founder Taylor Mark hosts a screening of Nick Francis’ film Black Gold tonight at the Tea Lounge. “As westerners revel in designer lattes and cappuccinos, impoverished Ethiopian coffee growers suffer the bitter taste of injustice. In this eye-opening expose an over $80 billion dollar industry (a commodity second only to oil in value) Black Gold traces one man’s fight for a fair price.”

Wednesday, May 12, 6:30pm
Growing Food Justice: How going local can help feed our city and the world
The Commons
388 Atlantic Ave., Downtown Brooklyn
Reflect on the significance of harvest festivals in contemporary (urban) times with the AJWS-AVODAH at this interactive program on hunger in New York City. A light dinner and panel discussion will be followed by an opportunity to take action in the community.
“Together we’ll learn about the reality of hunger in NYC and about some innovative (local) approaches to tackling it. Joel Berg will paint a picture of hunger in one of wealthiest cities in the world and Karen Washington will discuss the power and importance of the community garden movement in helping New Yorkers to feed themselves. Daniel Bowman Simon will share his own story of helping to establish the now famous White House Kitchen Garden as well as outline how his newest project aims to bring a garden to City Hall that would supply emergency food providers with fresh local produce. In the spirit of Shavuot, Rabbi Spodek will frame our discussion around Jewish imperatives towards justice. Guests will be invited to offer concrete volunteer power to the People’s Garden NYC campaign with a post-program action party.”

Saturday, May 15, 6pm
Slideluck Potshow XV
Manhattan Bridge Archway at Water & Pearl Sts., DUMBO
6pm Beautiful Bountiful Brooklyn Tasting Hour | 7pm Potluck | 9pm Slideshow
Tickets, $10
Slideluck Potshow returns to Brooklyn to team up with the New York Photo Festival for a spectacular evening of local food, potlucking, and a slideshow. Naturally, the theme will be bridges, and the projection will take place just beneath the Manhattan Bridge. Some of New York’s finest photographers will help curate– David Alan Harvey (National Geographic, Magnum, Burn,) Jae Choi (The Collective Shift,) and W.M. Hunt (Hasted Hunt Kraeutler, SVA).

“As Brooklyn is becoming almost synonymous with the seasonal, sustainable and local food movement, we’re going to tap into it by offering up a tasting hour with a number of Brooklyn-based farms, organizations and purveyors alongside Brooklyn Brewery Brewmaster’s Reserve beers – while tickets last. And as this is a potluck dinner, we’d like to invite people to bring dishes that have as many local, seasonal ingredients as possible.”

Saturday, May 15, 9am-noon
Tour de Farmers Markets
Eat Well Guide
Celebrate Bike Month NYC by joining Eat Well Guide for a leisurely bicycle tour of the Union Square, Fort Greene Park, and Grand Army Plaza greenmarkets. Pedal the city while exploring the markets and enjoy fresh food from local farms along the route. Eat Well tote bags, snacks, and good company provided.

Itinerary:
9:00 am – Union Square Greenmarket (NW corner)
10:30 am – Fort Greene Park Greenmarket
11:30 am – Grand Army Plaza Greenmarket

Saturday, May 15, 2-6pm
Garden Ride / Procession / Dance to Save the Community Gardens
Start: 2:00 PM, Center of Tompkins Square Park
End: Dias y Flores Community Garden, 522 E. 13th St, between Aves A & B
Come dressed as your favorite vegetable for a ho down to show the city what a vital part of our culture community gardens have become. The 2002 deal to save the city’s gardens is quickly approaching its expiration date, and a movement to renew protection of these spaces against development is lagging. The vegetable procession starts in Tompkins Square Park and ends in an after party at the beloved Dias y Flores Community Garden in the East Village. E-mail benshepard@mindspring.com for further information.

Sunday, May 16, 8:30am-7pm
A Day-a-Whey
Saxelby Cheesemongers
Tickets, $95
Journey to the East End of Long Islang with Anne Saxelby of Saxelby Cheesemongers to visit Wolffer Estate Vineyard for a wine tasting and picnic lunch and Mecox Bay Dairy for a tour of the farm. If weather permits, the day will end on a near-by beach, leaving tour-goers full of wine, cheese, sunshine.Read on for a full description of the day’s itinerary.

Sunday, May 16, 9am-4pm
Plant Sale and Container Gardening Workshop
Eagle St. Rooftop Farm
Eagle St., Greenpoint
If you fear you were born with a black thumb but are willing it to turn green, head over to the Sunday volunteer day and plant sale at Rooftop Farms on Eagle St. where farmer Annie Novak will give you some helpful instruction on how to successfully grow your own container garden.

Sunday, May 16, noon-4pm
Taste of Williamsburg
N 11th St. btwn Berry and Wythe Aves.
Tickets, $35 for 6 tastes, $95 for 18
Celebrate the flavors of the ‘hood at the inaugural Taste of Williamsburg with tastes from local favorites Dressler, DuMont, Diner, Marlow Sons & Daughters, Miranda, Fornino Pizzeria, Brooklyn Brewery, Juliette, Karczma, Brooklyn Star, Bakeri, Brooklyn Oenology, Sweetwater, El Almacen, Blackbird Parlour, The Lodge, Teddy’s Bar & Grill and more. All proceeds from the event benefit the building of the Northside Town Hall Community and Cultural Center, to be housed in the yet-to-be converted historic former Engine Company 212 firehouse.
_________________________________
Of note a few weeks down the road…

Wednesday, May 19, 7pm
Screening: Food Matters
Bushwick Food Coop
V Ultra Lounge
Suggested donation, $5
The Bushwick Food Coop continues to bring on the good food films, this time at V Ultra Lounge, where a screening of Food Matters will explore the health benefits of eating a balanced diet. A collection of interviews with leading nutritionists, naturopaths, scientists, M.D.s and medical journalists answer basic but vitally important questions about vitamins, whether or not organic is a better choice, natural treatments for lowering cholesterol, and foods that combat anxiety, depression, and even cancer.

Thursday, May 20, 6:30-8:30pm
Farmworkers’ Rights and Preserving Small Farms:
A Conversation about the Farmworkers Fair Labor Practices Act
Draesel Hall, Church of the Holy Trinity
316 East 88th St., btwn 1st & 2nd Ave.s
Tickets, $5-20 (No one will be turned away for lack of funds.)
RSVP here
“The farmworkers Fair Labor Practices Act is a New York State bill that was intended to provide fair labor protections to farmworkers who were excluded from the federal fair labor laws enacted in 1939. The legislation’s opponents have argued that, in its current form, the bill is not fair to smaller farms, which predominate in New York State. This forum will explore how the rights of farmworkers can be ensured without endangering the livelihoods of small farmers.”

Panelists include: Jody Bolluyt, farmer Roxbury Farm, policy committee member for NOFA-NY; Dr. Margaret Gray, Assistant Professor at Alelphi University, currently completing a book on Hudson Valley agriculture, food politics, and farmworkers; Lea Kone, assistant Director of NOFA-NY; Librada Paz, former farmworker for several decades and now farmworker advocate; Martin Rodriguez, famer/owner, Mimo Mex Farm; Reverend Richard Witt, Executive Director, Rural & Migrant Ministry.

Saturday, May 22, 2-4pm
City of Merchants
New York Marble Cemetery
41 1/2 2nd Ave., East Village
Tickets, $25-$50
The wonderful public market that has taken over where the Fulton Fish Market left off, the New Amsterdam Market, won’t return to the stalls at the old seaport until June. In the meantime, join your friends who are merchants on the LES for an afternoon of cocktails and refreshments in the honor of the products and service they provide our community.
“City of Merchants is a celebration of the independent businesses who are restoring the health and vitality of our communities, urban and rural. Please stop by on the afternoon of May 22 for spirits, light refreshment and conversation at the New York Marble Cemetery, a hidden garden of the 19th century. The event will feature an exhibit of mercantile paper-works by Robert Warner, Master Printer; a silent auction of items manufactured in our region; and our first annual Toast to Merchants.”

Monday, May 24, 6:30pm
Hungry Filmmakers
Anthology Film Archives
32 2nd Ave
“Hungry Filmmakers continues its tradition of showcasing excerpts or trailers from six upcoming or newly produced films that are hungry for wider audiences. Each filmmaker or a representative of the film will be in attendance for a lively Q&A which will be moderated on May 24th by Civil Eats editor Paula Crossfield. This third lineup of films expose further reasons to contemplate what we eat. From Michael Graziano’s urgent call for school lunch reform in Lunch Line, to George Langworthy and Maryam Henein’s enlightening connection between bees and food in Vanishing of the Bees, to Ginalola Lowry’s whimsical You Are What You Eat, each film clip will surely give audiences something to chew on.”
The complete lineup:
The Bering Sea: An Ecosystem in Crisis by Melissa Thompson
Vanishing of the Bees by George Langworthy and Maryam Henein
The Farmer and The Horse by Jared Flesher
Lunch Line by Michael Graziano
Pressure Cooker by Jennifer Grausman and Mark Becker
You Are What You Eat by Ginalola Lowry

Read Full Post »

5/3/10-5/9/10

Dear Local Gourmands,

I got up to Maine just in time for the first soft shell crabs of the year. And thank goodness I was staying with a friend who has found her way in the food world like I have– we woke up two mornings in a row, hit the Standard Baking Co., then crossed the street to the old fish market. Inside, the blue-shelled little crabs were displayed in neat rows. We sang our praises, then looked around to see that the baskets of oysters were just being refilled. Kara had to get to work (she’s a terrific cheese monger), so we placed an order to be picked up the next morning.

By the time we returned, the price for soft shells had dropped, an even better selection of oysters tempted us, the razor clams had arrived, and Kara bounced from stack to stack of whole fish from the morning’s catch, checking their eyes, feeling their gills, smelling their heads to check for freshness. In the evening her friends showed up as we were shelling the crabs to make a po’ boy. She showed me how to peel back the shell, then plop the meat in flour, dip it in egg, roll the mess around in cornmeal and finally immerse it in a pot of canola oil (which I’m happy to report was produced in Maine). I got a lesson in shucking oysters from her boyfriend, and remembered what it was like growing up on the coast of Maine, where people are not afraid to touch seafood with their hands– the ocean and the creatures in it are the way of life on the coast. We ate with our hands too, all of us gathered around the grill, gorging ourselves on fish, razor clams, roasted ramps, raw oysters, the po’ boy laden with tomatoes, lettuce, fried crab, and spicy homemade mayo– all flavors that brought this long lost Mainer right back to her seaside roots.

All best,
Jeanne

Monday, May 3, 6-8pm
Slow U: Consider Bardwell Farm
Jimmy’s No. 43
43 E. 7th St.
Tickets, $25 (members), $35 (non-members)

One of my great pleasures is stopping off at the Union Square Greenmarket on Monday evenings on my way home from work to pick up a piece of Dorset cheese from Consider Bardwell Farms. I eat it with a good crust of bread alongside salad or in omelets all week long. Meet Consider Bardwell’s founding farmer, Angela Miller, tonight at Jimmy’s No. 43 where she’ll tell you all about how cheese transformed her life. She will be joined by Consider Bardwell’s master cheese maker Peter Dixon, who will discuss the cheese making process and lead a tasting of Consider Bardwell cheeses, including award winning washed rind, raw cow, Dorset; aged raw goat, Manchester; aged raw cow “Toma”, Pawlet; and aged, raw cow “Alpine”, Rupert. Angela’s new book about her adventures in farming and cheese making, “Hay Fever”, will be available for purchase.

Monday, May 3, 6:30pm
Screening: Pressure Cooker
Eating Liberally and Food Systems Network New York
The Tank
354 W. 45th St btwn 8th & 9th Aves.
Tickets, $10-$20

Eating Liberally and Food Systems Network NYC present a screening of Pressure Cooker, an uplifting documentary directed by Jennifer Grausman that tells the story of a high school teacher in Philadelphia who puts her underprivileged students through a “culinary boot camp” to help them win scholarships to the country’s top culinary schools. The screening will be followed by a discussion with Grausman, Lynn Fredericks, the Family Cook Productions founder, and several youths who have benefited from these programs, including Fatoumata Dembele (one of the students featured in Pressure Cooker) and Dexter Ambrose of Brooklyn Automotive High School, whose inspiring teacher, Jenny Kessler, was recently featured in The New York Times. Proceeds from the event will benefit the Food Systems Network NYC.

Monday, May 3, 8-10pm
Brooklyn Brew Shop Beer Trivia Night
Bar Great Harry
280 Smith St.

Trivia night at the bar gets a whole lot better when the questions are all about beer– to win, it literally pays to drink more. Bring your best beer drinking friends to Bar Great Harry for a night of beer trivia where Erica and Stephen of Brooklyn Brew Shop will challenge your craft brew knowledge and reward winners with 1-gallon homebrew kits complete with new seasonal Rose Cheeked Blonde and Lady Lavender mixes as well as the Shop’s classic Grapefruit Honey Ale mix. Sign up in teams of four or six, or join a team at the bar.

Wednesday, May 5, 4:30-6:30pm
Paisly Farm CSA Sign Up and Seed Swap
Jimmy’s No. 43
43 E. 7th St.

Paisley Farm, a 25-acre farm in Tivoli, NY, will be providing CSA shares at five locations in the city and Brooklyn this season. Organic produce, fruit, and egg shares are all on offer. Visit the Upstate Farms website to learn more about share options and payment, and look forward to picking up your produce at one of these locations all summer long:
Jimmy’s No. 43 (sign up in person at Jimmy’s on May 5, and profit from a seed swap!)
Green Spaces
Central Park East School II
d.b.a. Brooklyn
Metropolitan Exchange

Wednesday, May 5
Brooklyn Uncorked
Edible Brooklyn at BAM
30 Lafayette Ave., Fort Greene
Tickets, $50

Edible Brooklyn, along with her sister pubs Edible Manhattan and Edible East End, and the Long Island Wine Council bring the borough a taste of world-class wines from our neighbors in Long Island wine country. Local chefs will pair seasonal plates with these local sips while winemakers tell you all about their grapes and the soil they’re grown from.

Wednesday, May 5, 6-9pm
Cinco de Mayo at Palo Santo
652 Union St., Park Slope
Call to reserve a table:
(718) 636-6311

Local food champion and Grand Army Plaza Greenmarket regular, chef Jacques Gautier, brings Cinco de Mayo to Brooklyn. Enjoy traditional Poblano dishes like mole paired with unlimited sangria and Mexican beer.

Thursday, May 6, 6-10pm
Brooklyn Food Coalition One Year Anniversary Party
388 Atlantic Ave.

The Brooklyn Food Coalition celebrates its first anniversary with delicious local food, drink and conversation. Anna Lappé will talk about her new book, Diet for a Hot Planet, and emcee as BFC activists share what they’ve been up to throughout the year.

Friday, May 7, 7pm
Dinner on the Farm
Queens County Farm Museum
73-50 Little Neck Parkway
Floral Park, New YorkTickets, $80

The inaugural dinner in a series of suppers on the farm hosted in part by the Queens County Farm Museum and Tamara Reynolds, author of Forking Fantastic! will be held in the Adriance Farmhouse, which dates from the early 18th century. Nearly all of the food will be sourced from the farm to provide a menu that showcases the expansive culinary heritage of the many groups that have made Queens the diverse and delicious borough that it is.

Saturday, May 8, 8am-12pm
Composting with Evolutionary Organics
Grand Army Plaza Greenmarket
Cost: $1

When I lived in Park Slope my dedicated effort to compost meant getting on the subway each Saturday with an impossibly stinky bag of kitchen scraps and terrorizing my fellow train riders all the way to Union Square where I’d contribute the dripping mess to the Lower East Side Ecology Center’s compost collection. I will admit I gave up the ritual by that August, and even though I now live in Fort Greene (with a terrific community compost collection) I still go to the Grand Army Plaza Greenmarket each Saturday. Recently Evolutionary Organics (the stand that sells the watermelon radishes I’m forever raving about) has started to offer a compost collection. Contribute one dollar to the farm, and they’ll happily take your precious carrot tops, leftover lettuce, and other precious kitchen scraps to the place where they belong.

Sunday, May 9-Sunday, May 16
Pig Week
Jimmy’s No. 43
43 E. 7th St.

It’s Pig Week at Jimmy’s No. 43, and the East Village gastropub lauded for its incredible selection of brews and menu featuring local ingredients (this week heritage pork from the Piggery will be featured) wouldn’t let it pass without just fanfare. See the line up below and jimmysno43.com for more info. Tickets are available online or by phone: 212.982.3006.

May 9, 1-4pm ($20):
The Piggery butchering demo with porky lunch and live bluegrass.
May 11, 6:30-8:30pm ($35): Bacon, cheese, chocolate, and beer pairing hosted by Josh Ozersky and the New York Degustation Advisory Team.
May 12: Local charcuterie and beer pairings featured a la carte on the menu.
May 13, 7:30-9:30pm ($10): “Meat” the Farmer– Just Food and Jimmy’s No. 43 present an
Informational Q & A with Mike Yezzi of Flying Pigs Farm. Learn how pig farms work, hear anecdotes, and hang out with the farmer. (All proceeds will benefit Just Food and Flying
Pigs Farm.)

Saturday, May 15, 6pm
Slideluck Potshow XV
Manhattan Bridge Archway at Water & Pearl Sts., DUMBO
6pm Beautiful Bountiful Brooklyn Tasting Hour | 7pm Potluck | 9pm Slideshow
Tickets, $10

Slideluck Potshow returns to Brooklyn to team up with the New York Photo Festival for a spectacular evening of local food, potlucking, and a slideshow. Naturally, the theme will be bridges, and the projection will take place just beneath the Manhattan Bridge. Some of New York’s finest photographers will help curate– David Alan Harvey (National Geographic, Magnum, Burn,) Jae Choi (The Collective Shift,) and W.M. Hunt (Hasted Hunt Kraeutler, SVA), and your own photo submissions will be accepted until May 4.

“As Brooklyn is becoming almost synonymous with the seasonal, sustainable and local food movement, we’re going to tap into it by offering up a tasting hour with a number of Brooklyn-based farms, organizations and purveyors alongside Brooklyn Brewery Brewmaster’s Reserve beers – while tickets last. And as this is a potluck dinner, we’d like to invite people to bring dishes that have as many local, seasonal ingredients as possible.”

Sunday, May 16, 8:30am-7pm
A Day-a-Whey
Saxelby Cheesemongers
Tickets, $95

Journey to the East End of Long Islang with Anne Saxelby of Saxelby Cheesemongers to visit Wolffer Estate Vineyard for a wine tasting and picnic lunch and Mecox Bay Dairy for a tour of the farm. If weather permits, the day will end on a near-by beach, leaving tour-goers full of wine, cheese, sunshine. Read on for a full description of the day’s itinerary.

Sunday, May 16, 9am-4pm
Plant Sale and Container Gardening Workshop
Eagle St. Rooftop Farm
Eagle St., Greenpoint

If you fear you were born with a black thumb but are willing it to turn green, head over to the Sunday volunteer day and plant sale at Rooftop Farms on Eagle St. where farmer Annie Novak will give you some helpful instruction on how to successfully grow your own container garden.


Sunday, May 16, noon-4pm
Taste of Williamsburg
N 11th St. btwn Berry and Wythe Aves.
Tickets, $35 for 6 tastes, $95 for 18

Celebrate the flavors of ‘hood at the inaugural Taste of Williamsburg with Tastes from local favorites Dressler, DuMont, Diner, Marlow Sons & Daughters, Miranda, Fornino Pizzeria, Brooklyn Brewery, Juliette, Karczma, Brooklyn Star, Bakeri, Brooklyn Oenology, Sweetwater, El Almacen, Blackbird Parlour, The Lodge, Teddy’s Bar & Grill and more. All proceeds from the event benefit the building of the Northside Town Hall Community and Cultural Center, to be housed in the yet-to-be converted historic former Engine Company 212 firehouse.

Wednesday, May 19, 7pm
Screening: Food Matters
Bushwick Food Coop
V Ultra Lounge
Suggested donation, $5

The Bushwick Food Coop continues to bring on the good food films, this time at V Ultra Lounge, where a screening of Food Matters will explore the health benefits of eating a balanced diet. A collection of interviews with leading nutritionists, naturopaths, scientists, M.D.s and medical journalists answer basic but vitally important questions about vitamins, whether or not organic is a better choice, natural treatments for lowering cholesterol, and foods that combat anxiety, depression, and even cancer.

Saturday, May 22, 2-4pm
City of Merchants
New York Marble Cemetery
41 1/2 2nd Ave., East Village
*Tickets go on sale May 6

The wonderful public market that has taken over where the Fulton Fish Market left off, the New Amsterdam Market, won’t return to the stalls at the old seaport until June. In the meantime, join your friends who are merchants on the LES for afternoon of cocktails refreshments in the honor of the products and service they provide our community.
“City of Merchants is a celebration of the independent businesses who are restoring the health and vitality of our communities, urban and rural. Please stop by on the afternoon of May 22 for spirits, light refreshment and conversation at the New York Marble Cemetery, a hidden garden of the 19th century. The event will feature an exhibit of mercantile paper-works by Robert Warner, Master Printer; a silent auction of items manufactured in our region; and our first annual Toast to Merchants.”

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