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Archive for March, 2010

3/29/10-4/3/10

Dear Local Gourmands,

Beyond the first flowering trees in Prospect Park, the Grand Army Plaza Greenmarket beckoned this Saturday with buckets of peach blossoms, a pile of the spring’s first spinach, and a knockout display of blue and speckled eggs at Evolutionary Organics. Feeling festive, I filled my bag with a whole grain boule from Kayuga Pure Organics, blackberry jam, radishes and carrots to be turned into pickles, and some collards for a mid-week dinner. Down to my last dollars, I spied an old friend who was working at the Blue Moon fish stall. He greeted me with a knowing smile: ‘You’re looking for scallops, aren’t you?’ This is a kid from Maryland who became famous at our college for being a great bass player and a great cook– stories of going to his parents’ house for crab dinners still leave me longing for Old Bay. Along with a handful of beautiful scallops, he sent me on my way with some of Blue Moon’s smoked fish which wound up in an omelet the next morning. While I ate, I read the opening of Molly O’Neill’s A Well Seasoned Appetite, which appropriately begins with spring and the excitement she can’t hold back at the first appearance of shad roe at her local fishmonger’s counter. She dubs this season the season for second chances, and it’s true– the produce returns, friends come out of the woodwork, and three months in, the possibilities of the new year begin to make themselves known. At last, we’ve arrived.

To spring again,
Jeanne

Monday, March 29 & April 5, 1-6pm
First Level Beer Sommelier Training
Jimmy’s No. 43
43 E. 7th St.

“Civilization of Beer Education Consulting invites you to participate in an exclusive, two day program that will prepare you to pass the first level Certified Beer Server TM. exam of the Cicerone Certification Beer Sommelier Program. This intensive program covers the knowledge most crucial to creating and maintaining diverse and profitable beer programs at the retail level. Subjects covered are beer ingredients, styles, brewing process, proper storage and service, flavor and evaluation, food and beer pairing and more.”

Seating is limited and open to beverage industry professionals with 2+ years experience dealing in beer. A spring session of the course commences on Mondays, May 10&17 from 1-6pm.

Monday, March 29, 7-9pm
Manhattan Slur
Apothoke
9 Doyers St.

The Slow Food NYC monthly happy hour turns up at Apothoke this time around, a bar that was inspired by European apothecaries and 19th century Parisian absinthe dens. Join fellow New Yorkers to talk about “slow minded” ideas, activities, and new initiatives, the leadership of Slow Food NYC, or just shoot the breeze with good company while tippling on elixirs made with fresh herbs and house-infused liqueurs.

Monday, March 29, 7-8:30pm
Hedonists Delight at Beer Table
427B 7th Ave., Park Slope
Tickets, $35

“Barleywines and Beasts: a tasting of various rare barleywines, presented by Michael Opalenski, paired with various smoked and cured meats from our talented friend Gabriel Ross of Dickson’s Farmstand. Michael and Gabe will discuss their products, and Justin will present the beer pairings and some special treats from the cellar. Hedonists delight! Purchase tickets here!”

Wednesday, March 31, 6:30-8:30pm
Screening: The End of the Line
Green Spaces
394 Broadway, 5th Floor
Tickets, $10 (suggested donation) in advance, $15 at the door

The Brooklyn Green Team, Green Edge, and Green Spaces present a screening of The End of the Line, a doc that made its premiere at Sundance in 2009 which examines the imminent extinction of bluefin tuna and other popular seafood and the implications of a world without fish. The End of the Line points to solutions that are simple and doable, but political will and activism are crucial to solve this international problem.

Thursday, April 1, 6:30pm
Launch of Diet for a Hot Planet
Wollman Hall at The New School
Eugene Lang Building
65 West 11th Street, 5th floor
(enter at 66 West 12th Street)

Anna Lappé launches her highly-anticipated third book, Diet for a Hot Planet, with a book talk and Q&A to honor the good work happening in New York City and across the country, dedicated to making our food system more sustainable and healthy for all.

Saturday, April 3, 10am
Open Volunteer Day East New York Farms
613 New Lots Ave., East New York

“Come get your hands dirty at the UCC Youth Farm. Lend a hand while you learn how we grow food in the city. Tasks include spreading woodchips, turning compost, weeding, planting, and harvesting. No experience necessary, just come ready to work outside and bring some water and a lunch or money to buy lunch at the market.”
________________________________
Of note a few weeks down the road…

Tuesday, April 6
Good Spirits at The Bell House
149 7th Street, Gowanus
Tickets, $40

Good spirits and good times will be free flowing at the Bell House where Edible Manhattan and Edible Brooklyn ring in the second installment of their cocktail series that celebrates local liquors and our borough’s favorite “mixology-minded chefs.” The Vanderbilt, No. 7, James, Walter Foods, The Farm on Adderley and Palo Santo prepare plates to go with perfectly paired cocktails concocted with storied spirits. Sip Empire State favorites like Tuthilltown Spirits and Warwick Valley Winery and Distillery, as well as small batch selections from Vertical Vodka, Chartreuse and Illegal Mexcal. $40 tickets for this evening of food, drink and merriment come with a complementary one-year subscription to Edible Manhattan or Edible Brooklyn when you enter the code “cocktail.”

Tuesday, April 6, 6-11pm
Blue Plate Special for FRESH
Jimmy’s No. 43
43 E. 7th St.
$22 Blue Plate Special

Tonight Jimmy’s No. 43 serves up a “Blue Plate Special” as a pre-opening benefit for the movie FRESH. Entreés include roast pork with apples and polenta, shrimp and grits, and local lamb sausages with olives and escarole. Your order includes a ticket to the good food flick that will be shown in theatres around New York beginning in April. Filmmaker Ana Joanes will also be in the house to chat up the cause and encourage a hopeful dialogue about how our food system is slowly being turned around.

Thursday, April 8, 7pm
Edible Estates: Attack on the Front Lawn with
Leonard Lopate, Fritz Haeg, Annie Novak, Will Allen, and Scott Stringer

The Greene Space
Tickets, $15

Leonard Lopate hosts a discussion on the future of urban agriculture in New York City and around the country featuring prominent figures from both the local and national scene. Speakers include Fritz Haeg, artist, designer, radical gardener, and author of Edible Estates; Will Allen, contributor to the book, and MacArthur winning founder of Milwaukee- based Growing Power; Annie Novak, founder of Rooftop Farms in Greenpoint; and Scott Stringer, Manhattan Borough President and the force behind “FoodNYC: A Blueprint for a Sustainable Food System,” the most comprehensive effort to date to unify and reform New York City’s policies regarding the production, distribution, consumption, and disposal of food.

Thursday, April 8, 6pm
Red, Hot and Potted:
a lecture, book signing and tasting with chili expert Dave DeWitt

Horticultural Society of New York Library
148 West 37th Street, 13th Floor, btwn Broadway and 7th Ave
Tickets, $10

The Horticultural Society of New York welcomes Dave DeWitt, co-author of The Complete Chile Pepper Book, to show city dwellers how to grow peppers in containers. He’ll offer practical growing advice, recommendations of chili varieties, sign books, and dole out sample tastes.

Saturday, April 10, 9am-noon
Black Farmers and Urban Gardeners Community Forum
388 Atlantic Ave.
Between Hoyt and Bond

Take part in the conversation around “What’s for Dinner? Connecting the Dots Between Food Access, Policy and the History of Agriculture from the Black Perspective.” Learn what black farmers and urban gardeners in New York are doing to get fresh, healthy, locally grown food on the tables of their families and neighbors. Guest speakers include Maya Wiley, Founder and Executive Director of the Center for Social Inclusion; Kolu Zigbi, Program Officer for Sustainable Agriculture and Food Systems at the Jessie Smith Noyes Foundation; and Jennifer Steverson, Public Programs Curator at Weeksville Heritage Center.

Sunday, April 11, 4-6pm
Tastebuds NYC Fundraiser for Hot Bread Kitchen
Jimmy’s No. 43
43 E. 7th St.
Tickets, $20

Tastebuds NYC, a lively social networking group for city foodies and good food advocates, throws a cook off benefit for Hot Bread Kitchen, an admirable non-profit that trains immigrant women in traditional baking techniques. The challenge for chefs? Use either Hot Bread’s corn tortillas or granola (both are truly outstanding products on their own) as a muse to show the judges what you bring to the table. Cook-off chefs will go head to head to compete for bragging rights and a great cause. Judges include Nick Suarez and Theo Peck of the Brooklyn Food Experiments, Alexis Powell Grossman from Crop to Cup, and Katrina Schultz Richter from Hot Bread Kitchen. For more information or to sign up to cook, e-mail Heidi Exline: hjexline@gmail.com.

Sunday, April 11, 6:30-10pm
Farmers Market Sweep
Littlefield
622 Degraw St., Brooklyn
Tickets, $12 in advance, $15 at the door

Bikeloc, a team of cycling locavore enthusiasts will take their love for the local food movement on the road this summer in a cross-country bike tour of small farms. Meet the mend behind the madness at a local food trivia night, Farmers Market Sweep, aka Brooklyn’s first food-themed game show. Aaron Zueck and Robert DuBois of Bikeloc, Louisa Shafia author of Lucid Food, Ava Chin of the New York Times, Joanna Shaw Flamm, editor of spoonandtrowel.com as well other prominent foodies will go head-to-head in a battle for the title of Champion Locavore.

The game show will be followed by the savory sounds of Smoothe Moose Laboratories featuring Brooklyn based cellist and electronic musician Cosmo D who will be serving it up with beat master DJ Saucy Crotch. If you’re interested in making a local snack for the event, please contact Aaron at aaron@bikeloc.org for details.

Sunday, April 11, 4:30-8pm
Betty Brooklyn Hors d’oeuvres and Cocktail Hour to Benefit BK Farmyards
220 Plymouth St. Suite 5A, DUMBO
Tickets, $20 in advance $25 at the door

Using the best of New York’s local, seasonal and organic produce, Betty Brooklyn prepares delicious, nourishing meals for people who love food. She also offers personalized private chef classes for individuals and small groups. Tonight her hors d’oeuvres get paired up with cocktails by Sister Liqueurs, Blue Point beer, in a benefit happy hour for BK Farmyards who is working with the High School for Public Service to create a 1-acre youth farm. The menu includes sautéed spring mushrooms with Salvatore Bklyn ricotta and tarragon, grilled marinated flank steak skewers with chimichurri sauce, deviled quail eggs with crispy bacon, and spring peas in ramp and pistachio pesto with radish slices on locally baked baguette.

Saturday, April 24, 10am-9pm
Earth Day Council
Hattie Carthan Community Farmers’ Market
Clifton Place and Marcy Avenue, Brooklyn

“Celebrate Earth Day at the Hattie Carthan Community Garden! The day will begin with a Garden Planning Workshop and Free Seed Giveaway followed by Feasting and a Community Workday engaging in various building and spring garden activities. To close the day, participate in Honoring the Web of Life and be a part of the Earth Day Council. This event is free and open to the public. For more information contact Yonnette: 718-638-3566 or hattiecarthangarden@yahoo.com.”

Sunday, April 25, 7pm
Just Food Benefit Honoring Joan Dye Gussow
Sotheby’s
1334 York Ave. at 72nd St.
Tickets, $175

Just Food honors Joan Gussow, chair of its first board of directors, and one of the founding forces that rallied the local food movement. As the Mary Swartz Rose Professor Emerita of Nutrition and Education at Teacher’s College where she formerly headed the Nutrition Education Department, Joan believes that eating from close to home makes economic, ecologic, and gastronomic sense and sacrifices neither taste nor pleasure. She is a highly acclaimed nutritionist, author, co-author, and editor of a number of articles and books, including her 2001 work, This Organic Life: Confessions of a Suburban Homestead, which is based on the lessons learned from decades of working toward growing her own.

Sunday, May 16, noon-4pm
Taste of Williamsburg
N 11th St. btwn Berry and Wythe Aves.
Tickets, $35 for 6 tastes, $95 for 18

Celebrate the flavors of ‘hood at the inaugural Taste of Williamsburg with Tastes from local favorites Dressler, DuMont, Diner, Marlow Sons & Daughters, Miranda, Fornino Pizzeria, Brooklyn Brewery, Juliette, Karczma, Brooklyn Star, Bakeri, Brooklyn Oenology, Sweetwater, El Almacen, Blackbird Parlour, The Lodge, Teddy’s Bar & Grill and more. All proceeds from the event benefit the building of the Northside Town Hall Community and Cultural Center, to be housed in the yet-to-be converted historic former Engine Company 212 firehouse.

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3/22/10-3/28/10

Dear Local Gourmands,

Many things to celebrate of late– the legalization of urban beekeeping in New York City, the passage of the healthcare bill, and Vernal Equinox, to boot! On Saturday the early burst of spring and convergence of exciting changes urged me up to our roof where I dusted off the porch furniture and invited friends for wine and snacks– thinly sliced mutsu apples, watermelon radishes, and rounds of toasted challah with goat cheese and honey. We toasted the new season with glasses of Riesling and stayed out late into the night, ignoring the evening chill because once you get a taste of 70 degree sun, there’s no going back inside. On this grey but remarkable Monday morning I wondered how others are honoring the momentous occasion of the dawn of healthcare reform– Ruth Reichl fixed herself a celebration breakfast of crispy hashbrowns, a fried egg, Porterhouse bone, and tangerines. How ’bout you?

In health, food, and solidarity,
Jeanne

March 22-26
The Chickens Are Coming!
Imani Garden
BK Farmyards

Lend your carpentry skills to BK Farmyards to help build out a chicken coop in the Imani Garden in Crown Heights. Plans for the coop can be seen here. 50 chickens are on their way, and they’ll need a nice place to lay for the egg CSA. If you or someone you know is an experienced carpenter, please send a note to volunteer (@) bkfarmyards.com with ‘CHICKEN COOP’ in the title line. Keep checking the BK Farmyards blog which will show all scheduled work days.

Monday, March 22nd, 9 PM
Homebrewer’s Meet Up
Beer Table
427B 7th Ave., Park Slope

Catch up with fellow homebrewers at tonight’s meet up where Ben and Danielle from Brooklyn Homebrew will be on hand to share tips, offer feed back, and share some of their own homemade suds.

Dine in Brooklyn
March 22-25
Lunch $20.10, dinner $25.00

The spring special, Dine in Brooklyn, continues this week. Plenty of the borough’s restaurants who champion locally grown produce are participating– iCi in Fort Greene, Anella in Greenpoint, and Applewood, Palo Santo, and Rosewater in Park Slope, among others. Make sure to call for a reservation in advance.

Tuesday, March 23 & Thursday, March 25, 6:30-8pm
Jam on with Anarchy in a Jar
In coordination with the Ted & Amy Supper Club
$40 per class

Laena McCarthy of Anarchy in a Jar demonstrates her jamming technique in this hands on class that will show participants how to make the most of seasonal fruits and treasures from your CSA haul by preserving them. She’ll let you in on a few handy tricks of the trade and then send you on your way with a jar of homemade goodness. Wine and sparkling water will be served to help loosen up your jam skills.

Tuesday, March 23, 6:30-8:30pm
A Celebration of Chinese Food in Today’s America
Culinary Historians of New York
Museum of the Chinese in the Americas (MoCA)
215 Centre Street (btw Grant/Howard, 1 block north of Canal)
Tickets, $40 (non-members and guests), $25 (MOCA/CHNY members), $22 (CHNY senior and student members)

CHNY honors Dr. Jacqueline Newman, 2009 recipient of the Amelia Award for lifetime achievement in culinary history, with a panel discussion on Chinese food in America today. Panelists include: Jessica Chien, pastry chef and food blogger; Jeffrey Chuang, illustrator and art designer; Kian Kam Kho, software engineer and food blogger; and Stephanie Wang-Breal, filmmaker; moderated by Andrew Coe, author of “Chop Suey: A Cultural History of Chinese Food in the United States.”

“Since the 1965 reform of the immigration laws, tens of thousands of Chinese have arrived in New York from every part of China. Most non-Chinese fans of Chinese food know that one result has been a golden age for exciting new restaurants serving all kinds of once-unfamiliar dishes. But what does the American or Chinese-American food scene look like to members of the Chinese-American community—or communities, since the makeup of today’s first- and second-generation immigrant population is so complex? How do people view the food that they cook at home, the different versions of Western food that they have encountered, the food served here in different kinds of supposedly Chinese restaurants? Four food-minded Chinese-Americans will relate their experiences in navigating Chinese and American culinary identities and share their thoughts on what’s happened to Chinese cuisine as it has become progressively woven into the American culinary fabric.”

Thursday, March 25, 4-6pm
Food Media in a World of New Media
Elmer Holmes Bobst Library, 3rd fl
70 Washington Square South

Clark Wolf moderates a panel that explores the expanding genre of food media and what the changing landscape of new media means for its writers and readers. Panelists include Frank Bruni, author and former New York Times restaurant critic, Scott Hocker, San Francisco edition editor of Tasting Table, Marion Nestle, author and NYU Paulette Goddard Professor of Food Studies, and Krishendu Ray, author and NYU Food Studies faculty.

Thursday, March 25, 7-9:30pm
Urban Ag Movie Night with BK Farmyards
388 Atlantic Ave.
Tickets, $25 at the door

BK Farmyards hosts an evening of films that document the urban ag movement, featuring Garden Cycles, The Greenhorns, and several other surprise shorts. Following the films the hosts will show an update on the progress of the Youth Farm at the High School for Public Service. Sip Sister Liqueurs cocktails like roasted beet martinis and lemoncello sours. Proceeds from the eve go toward the construction of a new greenhouse for the Youth Farm.

Thursday, March 25, 7-9pm
Local Rillettes and Wines of the Loire Valley
Pasanella and Son
115 South Street
Tickets, $45

Matthew Hranek, photographer by trade, upstate farmer by passion, travels the world for work, then comes home to raise pigs, hunt, fish, and forage. Tonight he pairs his farm-raised, homemade pork rillettes with wine from the Loire Valley. The tasting will be lead by Ryan Ibsen, Wine Dirctor of Pasanella and Son vintners, and Matthew Hranek of WM. Brown farm.

Saturday, March 27, 7-9pm
Real Milk: What’s the Real Deal?
A Lecture with Sally Fallon Morell
Subud Chelsea Center
230 West 29th Street btwn 7th and 8th Aves
Tickets, $20

“Sally Fallon Morell, president of the Weston A. Price Foundation and leading advocate in the real milk movement, will speak about the safety, health, economic and legal issues surrounding milk. Come learn why full-fat raw milk from grass-fed cows on pasture is nature’s safest and healthiest food, and the key to revitalizing small family farms and reclaiming our constitutional rights.”

Sunday, March 28, noon-4pm
The Brooklyn Brunch Experiment
The Bell House
149 7th St., Gowanus
Tickets, $20 (in advance), $25 (at the door)

Cook-off competitors Theo Peck and Nick Suarez turn their attention to brunch for the latest installment of their own cooking competition series, the Brooklyn Food Experiments. Bring your best waffles, your famous pancakes, your morning after eggs that bring ’em back for more. Prizes include a Cuisinart mixer and airplane tickets, plus the title of best brunch in the borough. Sean Rembold, chef at Diner and Marlow & Sons and Andrew Knowlton, editor for Bon Appetit, will judge the fare. If you think you’ve got what it takes, sign up to cook here. If you’d rather, just bring bring your appetite– after all, every New Yorker is always up for brunch. Tickets include one complementary beer and entrance to the after party.

Sunday, March 28, 6&9pm
Brooklyn Laundry Supper Club
Toren Building (penthouse), Brooklyn
Tickets, $85

Brooklyn Laundry, a supper club that makes its meals from the local bounty turns an eye to Italian cuisine presented in the pages of The Silver Spoon. The five-course tasting menu with wine pairings will be a spirited celebration of the menu created by Giorgio Locatelli of Locanda Locatelli in London. Feast on Pan-fried scallops, ravioli with rosemary jus, rabbit with prosciutto and polenta, and, of course, a cheese course. Amendei Di Cioccolato, “amendi chocolate tasteers” will cap off the eve.

_________________________________
Of note a few weeks down the road…

Monday, March 29 & April 5, 1-6pm
First Level Beer Sommelier Training
Jimmy’s No. 43
43 E. 7th St.

“Civilization of Beer Education Consulting invites you to participate in an exclusive, two day program that will prepare you to pass the first level Certified Beer Server TM. exam of the Cicerone Certification Beer Sommelier Program. This intensive program covers the knowledge most crucial to creating and maintaining diverse and profitable beer programs at the retail level. Subjects covered are beer ingredients, styles, brewing process, proper storage and service, flavor and evaluation, food and beer pairing and more.”

Seating is limited and open to beverage industry professionals with 2+ years experience dealing in beer. A spring session of the course commences on Mondays, May 10&17 from 1-6pm.

Monday, March 29, 7-8:30pm
Hedonists Delight at Beer Table
427B 7th Ave., Park Slope
Tickets, $35

“Barleywines and Beasts: a tasting of various rare barleywines, presented by Michael Opalenski, paired with various smoked and cured meats from our talented friend Gabriel Ross of Dickson’s Farmstand. Michael and Gabe will discuss their products, and Justin will present the beer pairings and some special treats from the cellar. Hedonists delight! Purchase tickets here!”

Thursday, April 1, 6:30pm
Launch of Diet for a Hot Planet
Wollman Hall at The New School
Eugene Lang Building
65 West 11th Street, 5th floor
(enter at 66 West 12th Street)

Anna Lappé launches her highly-anticipated third book, Diet for a Hot Planet, with a book talk and Q&A to honor the good work happening in New York City and across the country, dedicated to making our food system more sustainable and healthy for all.

Saturday, April 3, 10am
Open Volunteer Day East New York Farms
613 New Lots Ave., East New York

“Come get your hands dirty at the UCC Youth Farm. Lend a hand while you learn how we grow food in the city. Tasks include spreading woodchips, turning compost, weeding, planting, and harvesting. No experience necessary, just come ready to work outside and bring some water and a lunch or money to buy lunch at the market.”

Tuesday, April 6
Good Spirits at The Bell House
149 7th Street, Gowanus
Tickets, $40

Good spirits and good times will be free flowing at the Bell House where Edible Manhattan and Edible Brooklyn ring in the second installment of their cocktail series that celebrates local liquors and our borough’s favorite “mixology-minded chefs.” The Vanderbilt, No. 7, James, Walter Foods, The Farm on Adderley and Palo Santo prepare plates to go with perfectly paired cocktails concocted with storied spirits. Sip Empire State favorites like Tuthilltown Spirits and Warwick Valley Winery and Distillery, as well as small batch selections from Vertical Vodka, Chartreuse and Illegal Mexcal. $40 tickets for this evening of food, drink and merriment come with a complementary one-year subscription to Edible Manhattan or Edible Brooklyn when you enter the code “cocktail.”

Sunday, April 11, 4-6pm
TastebudsNYC Fundraiser for Hot Bread Kitchen
Jimmy’s No. 43
43 E. 7th St.
Tickets, $20

Tastebuds NYC, a lively social networking group for city foodies and good food advocates, throws a cook off benefit for Hot Bread Kitchen, an admirable non-profit that trains immigrant women in traditional baking techniques. The challenge for chefs? Use either Hot Bread’s corn tortillas or granola (both are truly outstanding products on their own) as a muse to show the judges what you bring to the table. Cook-off chefs will go head to head to compete for bragging rights and a great cause. Judges include Nick Suarez and Theo Peck of the Brooklyn Food Experiments, Alexis Powell Grossman from Crop to Cup, and Katrina Schultz Richter from Hot Bread Kitchen. For more information or to sign up to cook, e-mail Heidi Exline: hjexline@gmail.com.

Saturday, April 24, 10am-9pm
Earth Day Council
Hattie Carthan Community Farmers’ Market
Clifton Place and Marcy Avenue, Brooklyn

“Celebrate Earth Day at the Hattie Carthan Community Garden! The day will begin with a Garden Planning Workshop and Free Seed Giveaway followed by Feasting and a Community Workday engaging in various building and spring garden activities. To close the day, participate in Honoring the Web of Life and be a part of the Earth Day Council. This event is free and open to the public. For more information contact Yonnette: 718-638-3566 or hattiecarthangarden@yahoo.com.”

Sunday, April 25, 7pm
Just Food Benefit Honoring Joan Dye Gussow
Sotheby’s
1334 York Ave. at 72nd St.
Tickets, $175

Just Food honors Joan Gussow, chair of its first board of directors, and one of the founding forces that rallied the local food movement. As the Mary Swartz Rose Professor Emerita of Nutrition and Education at Teacher’s College where she formerly headed the Nutrition Education Department, Joan believes that eating from close to home makes economic, ecologic, and gastronomic sense and sacrifices neither taste nor pleasure. She is a highly acclaimed nutritionist, author, co-author, and editor of a number of articles and books, including her 2001 work, This Organic Life: Confessions of a Suburban Homestead, which is based on the lessons learned from decades of working toward growing her own.

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A few quick pics from my aunt’s back yard coop

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Dear Local Gourmands,

Raising chickens in your back yard sounds like less of a bird brained idea than ever, given the national attention that kitchen gardens and the grow your own movement has picked up over the last few years. Urban coops were the focus of the first story in this weekend’s Times magazine and our fine feathered friends steal the cover of the spring catalog my parents have been pulling together for their store, Downtown Home and Garden. Over the weekend I was visiting my 96 year old grandmother in Minneapolis who has recently moved into my aunt’s house. Aunt Patsy and her clan built a beautiful coop last year, and each morning breakfast consists of fresh eggs. All this seems familiar to my grandmother who earned her first pocket money by plucking and gutting the chickens her family kept in the back yard of the house she grew up in in Alton, Illinois. Feeling quite proud of and refreshed by a visit to my midwestern roots, I’ll return to Brooklyn tonight where the movement moves on. BK Farmyards has partnered with NYRP to build a chicken coop to house 50 birds in the Imani Garden in Crown Heights. If you’re free next week, bring your tool belt and your carpentry skills to help build these girls a new home.

All the best,
Jeanne

Dine in Brooklyn
March 15-25
Lunch $20.10, dinner $25.00

The spring special, Dine in Brooklyn, is upon us! Plenty of the borough’s restaurants who champion locally grown produce are participating– iCi in Fort Greene, Anella in Greenpoint, and Applewood, Palo Santo, and Rosewater in Park Slope, among others. Make sure to call for a reservation in advance.

Tuesday, March 16, 6pm
Culinary Luminaries: Joseph Baum, Restaurant Impresario
The New School Food Studies Program
Theresa Lang Community and Student Center, Arnold Hall
55 West 13th St, 2nd floor
Tickets, $5 (available at box office); free to all students and New School faculty, staff, and alumni with ID

Legendary restauranteur Joe Baum was responsible for such show-stopping establishments as Windows on the World, the Four Seasons, and la Fonda Del Sol, to name a few. In this panel discussion the culinary luminary is remembered for his triumphant personality that enabled him to bring his staff together to pull off extraordinary feats and ultimately change the restaurant industry.

Panelists include: Michael Batterberry, editor-in–chief and publisher of Food Arts Magazine; William Grimes, author of Appetite City, former New York Times restaurant critic; Milton Glaser, Graphic and Interior Designer on many projects for Joseph Baum; Hugh Hardy, Principal and Founder of H3 Hardy Collaboration Architecture, LLC.; and Michael Whiteman, President of Joseph Baum and Michael Whiteman Company.

Saturday, March 20, 9am-4pm
GreenThumb Grow Together
Hostos Community College
149th St & The Grand Concourse, Bronx
Admission, $3 (in advance), $5 (day of)

This year marks the 26th GreenThumb Grow Together with a return of favorite workshops from years past and a new focus on youth gardens. Bobby Wilson, President of the American Community Gardening Association will deliver the keynote address.

Saturday-Sunday, March 20-21
Vernal Equinox Hogget Cook-off
Weekend admission: $45-200/per adult (sliding scale) $15/per child under 12
*Worktrade options available

“In honor of the vernal equinox, spring and the start of a new growing season, join The Greenhorns and Animal Welfare Approved at Kinderhook Farm in Valatie, NY on March 20-21 for a celebration of agricultural activities, rural community and a farm to table feast.

A Hogget is a yearling lamb yet to be sheared that has been raised on pasture throughout the year and fed hay & legumes from the farm through the winter. Lambs are traditionally born between the end of January and beginning of March. This allows the young lambs to nurse naturally and weaned when the pastures grow back in the spring. The Kinderhook Farm hogget we will be working with reflects the age, size and tenderness of a lamb of this age.

The event begins with a butchery demonstration of the whole hogget, followed by a cooking demonstration, hide tanning, wool crafts and soap making. Saturday will close with a feast and musical performance by folk collective The Red Rooster. Coffee, tea and snacks will be provided throughout the day.

On Sunday the activities will continue with morning Yoga at Kinderhook Farm and tours of McEnroe Organic Farm and Old Chatham Sheepherding Company. There are also great local hiking trails, sculpture fields and restaurants worth checking out.”

For any Questions please contact: La Mason @ cheflamason@gmail.com or Severine von Tscharner Fleming @severine@pixiepoppins.org

Schedule of Events:

Saturday, March 20
At Kinderhook Farm

All Day – Hide Tanning, Wool Crafts, Soap Making workshops
10:00 am Opening Remarks
10:30 am Hogget Butchering Demonstration
1:00 pm Light Lunch
2:00 pm Cooking Demonstrations
7:00 pm Hogget Feast in the Barn
The Red Rooster Folk Collective will close the evening with music

Sunday, March 21
At Kinderhook Farm

10:30am–3pm Hide Tanning, Wool Crafts, Soap Making
11:00am Yoga in the Barn
12:30-2:30 Hogget Stew

At McEnroe Organic Farm
1pm Farm Tour
3pm Farm Tour
_________________________________
Of note a few weeks down the road…

March 22-26
The Chickens Are Coming!
Imani Garden
BK Farmyards

Lend your carpentry skills to BK Farmyards to help build out a chicken coop in the Imani Garden in Crown Heights. Plans for the coop can be seen here. 50 chickens are on their way, and they’ll need a nice place to lay for the egg CSA. If you or someone you know is an experienced carpenter, please send a note to volunteer (@) bkfarmyards.com with ‘CHICKEN COOP’ in the title line. Keep checking the BK Farmyards blog which will show all scheduled work days.

Tuesday, March 23, 6:30-8:30pm
A Celebration of Chinese Food in Today’s America Culinary Historians of New York
Museum of the Chinese in the Americas (MoCA)
215 Centre Street (btw Grant/Howard, 1 block north of Canal)
Tickets, $40 (non-members and guests), $25 (MOCA/CHNY members), $22 (CHNY senior and student members)

CHNY honors Dr. Jacqueline Newman, 2009 recipient of the Amelia Award for lifetime achievement in culinary history, with a panel discussion on Chinese food in America today. Panelists include: Jessica Chien, pastry chef and food blogger; Jeffrey Chuang, illustrator and art designer; Kian Kam Kho, software engineer and food blogger; and Stephanie Wang-Breal, filmmaker; moderated by Andrew Coe, author of “Chop Suey: A Cultural History of Chinese Food in the United States.”

“Since the 1965 reform of the immigration laws, tens of thousands of Chinese have arrived in New York from every part of China. Most non-Chinese fans of Chinese food know that one result has been a golden age for exciting new restaurants serving all kinds of once-unfamiliar dishes. But what does the American or Chinese-American food scene look like to members of the Chinese-American community—or communities, since the makeup of today’s first- and second-generation immigrant population is so complex? How do people view the food that they cook at home, the different versions of Western food that they have encountered, the food served here in different kinds of supposedly Chinese restaurants? Four food-minded Chinese-Americans will relate their experiences in navigating Chinese and American culinary identities and share their thoughts on what’s happened to Chinese cuisine as it has become progressively woven into the American culinary fabric.”

Thursday, March 25, 4-6pm
Food Media in a World of New Media
Elmer Holmes Bobst Library, 3rd fl
70 Washington Square South

Clark Wolf moderates a panel that explores the expanding genre of food media and what the changing landscape of new media means for its writers and readers. Panelists include Frank Bruni, author and former New York Times restaurant critic, Scott Hocker, San Francisco edition editor of Tasting Table, Marion Nestle, author and NYU Paulette Goddard Professor of Food Studies, and Krishendu Ray, author and NYU Food Studies faculty.

Saturday, March 27, 7-9pm
Real Milk: What’s the Real Deal? A Lecture with Sally Fallon Morell
Subud Chelsea Center
230 West 29th Street btwn 7th and 8th Aves
Tickets, $20

“Sally Fallon Morell, president of the Weston A. Price Foundation and leading advocate in the real milk movement, will speak about the safety, health, economic and legal issues surrounding milk. Come learn why full-fat raw milk from grass-fed cows on pasture is nature’s safest and healthiest food, and the key to revitalizing small family farms and reclaiming our constitutional rights.”

Sunday, March 28, noon-4pm
The Brooklyn Brunch Experiment
The Bell House
149 7th St., Gowanus
Tickets, $20 (in advance), $25 (at the door)

Cook-off competitors Theo Peck and Nick Suarez turn their attention to brunch for the latest installment of their own cooking competition series, the Brooklyn Food Experiments. Bring your best waffles, your famous pancakes, your morning after eggs that bring ’em back for more. Prizes include a Cuisinart mixer and airplane tickets, plus the title of best brunch in the borough. Sean Rembold, chef at Diner and Marlow & Sons and Andrew Knowlton, editor for Bon Appetit, will judge the fare. If you think you’ve got what it takes, sign up to cook here. If you’d rather, just bring bring your appetite– after all, every New Yorker is always up for brunch. Tickets include one complementary beer and entrance to the after party.

Tuesday, April 6
Good Spirits at The Bell House
149 7th Street, Gowanus
Tickets, $40

Good spirits and good times will be free flowing at the Bell House where Edible Manhattan and Edible Brooklyn ring in the second installment of their cocktail series that celebrates local liquors and our borough’s favorite “mixology-minded chefs.” The Vanderbuilt, No. 7, James, Walter Foods, The Farm on Adderley and Palo Santo prepare plates to go with perfectly paired cocktails concocted with storied spirits. Sip Empire State favorites like Tuthilltown Spirits and Warwick Valley Winery and Distillery, as well as small batch selections from Vertical Vodka, Chartreuse and Illegal Mexcal. $40 tickets for this evening of food, drink and merriment come with a complementary one-year subscription to Edible Manhattan or Edible Brooklyn when you enter the code “cocktail.”

Sunday, April 25, 7pm
Just Food Benefit Honoring Joan Dye Gussow
Sotheby’s
1334 York Ave. at 72nd St.
Tickets, $175

Just Food honors Joan Gussow, chair of its first board of directors, and one of the founding forces that rallied the local food movement. As the Mary Swartz Rose Professor Emerita of Nutrition and Education at Teacher’s College where she formerly headed the Nutrition Education Department, Joan believes that eating from close to home makes economic, ecologic, and gastronomic sense and sacrifices neither taste nor pleasure. She is a highly acclaimed nutritionist, author, co-author, and editor of a number of articles and books, including her 2001 work, This Organic Life: Confessions of a Suburban Homestead, which is based on the lessons learned from decades of working toward growing her own.

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Fellow food writer and Pitom groupie Leah Koenig serves up pie at Dixon Place tonight.

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Tuscan kale and Polish sausage in my white bean soup– all local!

Inspired by this recipe in the Times, I helped myself to ingredients at the Greenmarket over the weekend and produced what will *hopefully* be the last batch of soup for this season. Hope I’m not eating my words too soon. The soup tastes better!

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3/8/10-3/14/10

Dear Local Gourmands,

Spring, especially early spring, is the season for big ideas. Something called the gardening bug has bitten me and already I’m fantasizing salads grown from my (yet to be constructed) raised beds, which I imagine we’ll eat amidst the greenery that will grow prolifically from our rooftop. First thing’s first though– you gotta test your soil. And if you don’t have soil to test, well you need to get some like yesterday. I already feel like I’m behind!

Luckily this Saturday marks the 29th anniversary of the Brooklyn Botanic Garden’s Making Brooklyn Bloom, a free day-long conference dedicated to helping you start the growing season off right. This year’s line-up of seminars and speakers take a look at Brooklyn’s soil– the necessary foundation from which we’ll green the borough and grow some super-local food. From soil testing to rooftop farming, the BBG is sure to inspire your spring fever to take hold while providing you with the know-how to turn your wildest dreams into a fruitful harvest. The event is free, but you must show up at 10am to get in on the action.

Let’s roll up our sleeves,
Jeanne

Tuesday, March 9, 12:30-2pm
Food Systems Network New York Open Networking Meeting
Fund for the City of New York
121 Ave. of the Americas, 6th floor

March’s open networking meeting welcomes Steven Romalewski, Director, CUNY Mapping Service at CUNY Graduate Center who will give a tour of the Open Accessible Space Information System (OASIS). The tour will focus on the recently updated community gardens layer completed by Mara Gittleman, a Compton Fellow who works for Grow NYC.

“The Open Accessible Space Information System (OASIS) website provides the richest source of community maps for New York City — free and all in one place. It helps nonprofits, community groups, educators, students, public agencies, and local businesses develop a better understanding of their environment with interactive maps of open spaces, property information, transportation networks, and more.”

Wednesday, March 10, 7:30pm
Dixon Place Presents: Pitom and Pie Tasting
Dixon Place
161 A Chrystie St.

Dixon Place shines a light on all-American pies tonight when local talent Pitom takes to the stage at the famed Lower East Side performance space. Food writer Leah Koenig will be in the audience serving up slices of goodness while the band wails away.

Wednesday, March 10, 6:30-8:30pm
New York State Meat and Potatoes
European Kitchen Center
13 East 27th Street
Tickets, $25 (AIWF members), $35 (non-members)

Tonight the American Institute of Wine and Food turns its attention to the health benefits of eating grass fed beef. Together, a New York State beef producer, distributor, restaurant owner, and chef tell the story of how locally raised, grass fed beef gets from farm to table. Ken Jaffe of Slope Farms in the Catskills of Delaware County, New York, George Faison of DeBragga distributors, Andrew Tarlow and Sean Rembold, owner and chef of Diner and Marlow & Sons help put together the different pieces in this all-important discussion, demonstration, and tasting.

Wednesday, March 10, 5:30-8:30pm
Prospects, Pitfalls, and Prodigies: The Hudson Valley Dairy Industry
An Evening with Ag 2.0
The Smith
55 3rd Ave.
Tickets, $10 (advance) $20 (at the door)

This month’s return of the tremendously successful Ag 2.0 holds court at The Smith where sustainable food folks from all over the city will gather to talk shop, swap ideas, and no doubt trade business cards like professional poker players. Guest speakers include dairy farmers Jessica and Stuart Ziehm of Tiashoke Farms, Dante Hesse of Milk Thistle Farm, and John Friedman, attorney and advisor to sustainable agriculture businesses. “Attendees hail from investment and consulting firms, farms and Greenmarkets, universities, food-related non-profits, food manufacturers, retailers, and restaurants. We’ll come together to network, talk food and ag, and catalyze the movement to a more sustainable food system. If you work in food and agriculture — or would like to — don’t miss this gathering of like-minded and local professionals.”

Thursday, March 11, 7:30pm
Local Dinner and Wine Pairing with Chef and Winemaker at Palo Santo
Palo Santo
652 Union St.
Reservations, $75 (718.636.6311)

Eat with the chef and drink with the winemaker at Palo Santo for this evening’s locally sourced and thoughtfully paired menu. Chef Jacques Gautier will serve a five-course dinner matched with six wines from one of his resto’s favorite local winemakers, Bernard Cannac of Heron Hill Winery.

Saturday, March 13, 10am-4pm
Making Brooklyn Bloom
Brooklyn Botanic Garden
1000 Washington Ave.
*free

“Kick off the spring gardening season at Brooklyn Botanic Garden with this daylong conference on how to green up our communities by revitalizing our soil, the foundation of life in the garden. This free event features a keynote address by Dr. Nina Bassuk, director of the Urban Horticulture Institute at Cornell University, developer of Cornell Structural Soil, and author of Trees in the Urban Landscape. Visit exhibits and workshops on Rooftop Farming, Community Composting, and Testing Your Soil. No pre-registration is required, but you must arrive at 10 a.m. to register for the day’s workshops.

Saturday, March 13, 2-5pm
Slow U: The Locavore Hunter
Slow Food NYC
Jimmy’s No. 43
43 E. 7th St.
Tickets, $25 (SFNYC members), $35 (non-members)

The Slow Food chapter of New York City invites locavore hunter, writer, and instructor, Jackson Landers, to teach city dwellers how to hunt the overpopulation of Whitetail deer that are roaming rural and suburban New York and New Jersey in record numbers.
“Learn the basic information that an aspiring locavore hunter needs to know to start hunting deer for food. Techniques will be discussed that allow even apartment-dwelling urbanites to hunt, dress, age and butcher their own meat for the cost of a few tools and a hunting license. No pickup truck required.” He’ll also demonstrate how to butcher a venison hindquarter and back strap using basic home kitchen utensils, while the crew at Jimmy’s No. 43 prepare these cuts for the class to try.

Saturday, March 13, 3:30-5pm
Educated Eater Panel:
Off The Hook: Why Local Seafood is Sustainable
92Y Tribeca
200 Hudson St. at Canal
Tickets, $10 (call: 212-601-1000, or www.92y.org)

If you caught The End of the Line at Hungry Filmmakers last week, this panel on local, sustainable seafood in our region will hopefully answer some of your lingering questions about what seafood is safe to eat here in New York City. Which seafood guide should you refer to? Is the fish you buy in the market sustainably caught? Greenmarket has assembled a panel of fishermen, a regulatory agent, a marine advocate, and a chef to set the record straight, and talk about the positive steps that are being taken towards a more sustainable future for our local waters and the communities who fish them.

“Moderated by Colin Alevras former Chef of the Tasting Room and currently Beverage Director for David Chang’s Momofuku restaurants, and including: Alex and Stephanie Villani from Blue Moon Fish in Mattituck, NY; Christopher M. Moore Chief of the Partnerships and Communications Division in the office of Sustainable Fisheries at NOAA Fisheries Service ; and Niaz Dorry, Director of the Northwest Atlantic Marine Alliance (NAMA).”
_________________________________
Of note a few weeks down the road…


Monday, March 15, 7am-8pm
No Farms No Food Rally
American Farmland Trust

Head to Albany for the No Farms No Food Rally to tell our state legislators why they must invest in New York State’s farm and food systems. Governor Patterson’s budget proposes cuts that will eliminate programs that help farmers make a good living, such as the Farmers Market Grants program and the New York Farm Viability Institute. The Farmland Protection Program, the premier state program for protecting irreplaceable farmland from development, may be shut down for at least two years. Meanwhile, the Hunger Prevention and Nutrition Assistance Program, which helps provide nutritious food to food pantries, is being cut by $1 million.

These cuts are not inevitable! The American Farmland Trust has organized a FREE Bolt bus from Manhattan to Albany on the day of the rally. Contact Tammey at tholtby@farmland.org or call (518) 581-0078 to RSVP today.

The day’s agenda in the state capitol will cover the following: protection of farmland for future generations, the increase of consumer access to nutritious foods grown in New York, help for farmers to protect water and the environment, and strengthening the economic viability of farms.

Monday, March 15, 6-8:30pm
NYC Debut of Big River
Brecht Forum
451 West St. btwn Bank and Bethune Sts.
Tickets, $25 (FSNYC members), $35

From the makers of King Corn comes their long-awaited follow up film, Big River. Food Systems New York hosts the flick’s New York debut, followed by a panel discussion with the filmmakers, Ian Chenney, Curt Ellis, Aaron Woolf, along with Hudson Valley farmer Cheryl Rogowski, and Steve Rosenberg, Senior Vice President of Scenic Hudson.

Tuesday, March 16, 6pm
Culinary Luminaries: Joseph Baum, Restaurant Impresario
The New School Food Studies Program
Theresa Lang Community and Student Center, Arnhold Hall
55 West 13th St, 2nd floor
Tickets, $5 (available at box office); free to all students and New School faculty, staff, and alumni with ID

Legendary restauranteur Joe Baum was responsible for such show-stopping establishments as Windows on the World, the Four Seasons, and la Fonda Del Sol, to name a few. In this panel discussion the culinary luminary is remembered for his triumphant personality that enabled him to bring his staff together to pull off extraordinary feats and ultimately change the restaurant industry.

Panelists include: Michael Batterberry, editor-in–chief and publisher of Food Arts Magazine; William Grimes, author of Appetite City, former New York Times restaurant critic; Milton Glaser, Graphic and Interior Designer on many projects for Joseph Baum; Hugh Hardy, Principal and Founder of H3 Hardy Collaboration Architecture, LLC.; and Michael Whiteman, President of Joseph Baum and Michael Whiteman Company.

Saturday, March 20, 9am-4pm
GreenThumb Grow Together
Hostos Community College
149th St & The Grand Concourse, Bronx
Admission, $3 (in advance), $5 (day of)

This year marks the 26th GreenThumb Grow Together with a return of favorite workshops from years past and a new focus on youth gardens. Bobby Wilson, President of the American Community Gardening Association will deliver the keynote address.

Tuesday, March 23, 6:30-8:30pm
A Celebration of Chinese Food in Today’s America
Culinary Historians of New York
Museum of the Chinese in the Americas (MoCA)
215 Centre Street (btw Grant/Howard, 1 block north of Canal)
Tickets, $40 (non-members and guests), $25 (MOCA/CHNY members), $22 (CHNY senior and student members)

CHNY honors Dr. Jacqueline Newman, 2009 recipient of the Amelia Award for lifetime achievement in culinary history, with a panel discussion on Chinese food in America today. Panelists include: Jessica Chien, pastry chef and food blogger; Jeffrey Chuang, illustrator and art designer; Kian Kam Kho, software engineer and food blogger; and Stephanie Wang-Breal, filmmaker; moderated by Andrew Coe, author of “Chop Suey: A Cultural History of Chinese Food in the United States.”

“Since the 1965 reform of the immigration laws, tens of thousands of Chinese have arrived in New York from every part of China. Most non-Chinese fans of Chinese food know that one result has been a golden age for exciting new restaurants serving all kinds of once-unfamiliar dishes. But what does the American or Chinese-American food scene look like to members of the Chinese-American community—or communities, since the makeup of today’s first- and second-generation immigrant population is so complex? How do people view the food that they cook at home, the different versions of Western food that they have encountered, the food served here in different kinds of supposedly Chinese restaurants? Four food-minded Chinese-Americans will relate their experiences in navigating Chinese and American culinary identities and share their thoughts on what’s happened to Chinese cuisine as it has become progressively woven into the American culinary fabric.”

Tuesday, April 6
Good Spirits at The Bell House
149 7th Street, Gowanus
Tickets, $40

Good spirits and good times will be free flowing at the Bell House where Edible Manhattan and Edible Brooklyn ring in the second installment of their cocktail series that celebrates local liquors and our borough’s favorite “mixology-minded chefs.” The Vanderbuilt, No. 7, James, Walter Foods, The Farm on Adderley and Palo Santo prepare plates to go with perfectly paired cocktails concocted with storied spirits. Sip Empire State favorites like Tuthilltown Spirits and Warwick Valley Winery and Distillery, as well as small batch selections from Vertical Vodka, Chartreuse and Illegal Mexcal. $40 tickets for this evening of food, drink and merriment come with a complementary one-year subscription to Edible Manhattan or Edible Brooklyn when you enter the code “cocktail.”

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