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Archive for January, 2010

1/25/10-1/31/10

Dear Local Gourmands,

The line stretched to the back of the bar at K&M on Saturday for the BK Farmyards Pie Cook-off cum fundraiser. Bakers from around the borough toted homemade masterpieces draped gingerly with dishcloths, protected by vintage cake carriers, nestled into nifty wire travel racks. I’d woken up thinking about pie and hadn’t stopped for ten hours straight– the end result was an improvised creation I called the Happy Hour Pie– apples drunk with a honey/whiskey/butter glaze over a layer of goat cheese. Pie, as it turns out, makes a terrific bar snack. My roommate made a killer pear and cardamom pie, my friend Noah carefully crafted a pie of chocolate and sweet potato swirled together. The watering hole that was once a pierogi plant was packed to the hilt, bloggers video taped themselves as they got on line to submit their entries, documentary makers filmed the event organizers as they counted wads of cash from the supporters/eaters that streamed through the door. The crowd tried to play it off like this was just for fun, but an intense undercurrent of competition was palpable. Ten hours, two Greenmarkets, a call to my mother, and an afternoon cocktail to calm me down had gone into my pie alone. 62 similar stories showed up– all bakers who have made their way (along with their recipes) to Brooklyn from hometowns around the country. Variations on southern cream pies, midwestern summer berry pies, blue ribbon county fair pies were lined up for thoughtful inspection. As we waited for the judges to do their business, stories of grandmothers and Thanksgivings past filled the room. The music blared, the beer flowed freely, and eventually the crowd dove in. I’m sorry if you missed it– the results were tremendous. Best of all, BK Farmyards, the folks who brought us together, raised some serious dough, and I’m not talking about crust. The organization that aims to bring communities together by creating farms out of urban spaces push an educational agenda that includes eating seasonally, growing food locally, storing and preparing food, species biodiversity, and food democracy. “We aim to build a local food network that enhances the health of our culture, our people, and our environment.” You can still donate funds to help out with the creation of their 1-acre farm at the High School for Public Service that’ll be coming up this spring.

All best,
Jeanne

Monday, January 25, 6-9pm
Good Spirits at Almond
Almond
12 E. 22nd St.
Tickets, $40

Edible Manhattan and Brooklyn hosts their first annual cocktail party at Almond restaurant on 22nd St. Six local restaurants will pair food with six cocktails, including one made with the amazing local Tuthilltown hooch, another created with Rhum J.M. from Martinique, a beery quaff made with Heartland Brewery’s new keg series, a grapey mixer with Wolffer Estate Vineyards verjus, a concoction mixed with Dallis Coffee elixir, and more. Space is limited, so purchase tix now. Enter the code “cocktail” and the hosts will include a one-year subscription to Edible Manhattan for free.

Tuesday, January 26, 6-9
Slow Food NYC: The Manhattan Slur
City Winery
155 Varick St.

The local chapter of Slow Food celebrates it’s first monthly cocktail meeting of the year at City Winery. Get together with like-minded local foodies who appreciate the “Slow” movement to talk about ideas and projects for the year ahead. For this evening of revelry City Winery will be extending their “Crush Hour” special: $15 for a carafe and $5 for a glass or tasting flight of any house-made tap wine.

Thursday, January 28, 6:30pm
Foodie Book Club: The Jungle
The Brooklyn Kitchen
616 Lorimer St., Williamsburg

The Brooklyn Kitchen kicks off this year’s Foodie Book Club series with a discussion of Upton Sinclair’s The Jungle. “Published in 1906, this seminal work was written to highlight the plight of the working class and to remove from obscurity the corruption of the American meatpacking industry during the early 20th century.” Bring a dish to share, ’cause naturally the Foodie Book Club doubles as a pot luck.

Thursday, January 28, 7-9pm
The Great Oyster Shuck-off
Jimmy’s No. 43
43 E. 7th St.
Tickets, $20 (at the door)

Slap-downs, cook-offs, take-downs, and pretty much any other type of head-to-head cooking competition you can conceive of has graced the back room of Jimmy’s No. 43 over the years. From cassoulet to chowder to curry, we’ve made friends, made connections, and made some memories in this beer nook specially crafted for those devoted to the local food way of life in New York City. Jimmy’s had his heart set on oysters since September when we were all celebrating Henry Hudson’s legendary discovery. Ever since Jimmy’s devoted Thursday nights to local oysters. This Thursday he takes the local food scene to a new level with an oyster shuck-off. Oyster growers Karen Rivara and Jim Markow will talk about growing oysters and demonstrate their oyster shucking skills with 600-800 Peconic Pearls and Mystics. A selection of stouts and porters will be featured at the bar.

Sunday, January 31, 1-5pm
The Brooklyn Taco Experiment
The Bell House
149 7th St., Gowanus
Tickets, (advance) $20, (at the door) $25

Nick Suarez and Theo Peck of the Food Experiments bring on the next installment in their series of home cooking competitions with the Brooklyn Taco Experiment. Bring your best to the Bell House and show Brooklyn what you got going in your taco: enter the competition here. Tortillas will be provided to chefs by Tortilleria Chinantla. The judging panel includes Andrew Knowlton (Bon Appetit and Iron Chef judge), Cesar Fuentes (Executive Director of the Food Vendor’s Committee of Red Hook Park), Dave Vendley (Calexico), and Brandon Gillis (Bark Hot Dogs). Needless to say, the eating will be good, the competition fierce, the after party hot. A portion of the proceeds will benefit research for Ovarian Cancer.

Sunday, January 31, 1:30pm
Gastropolis: Finding Your Food ‘Voice’
Brooklyn Public Library, Dweck Center
Grand Army Plaza

Jonathan Deutsch, Ph.D. leads a discussion on the ways in which food conveys meaning and aspects of New York City cultural identities. Deutsch is co-editor of Gastropolis, a classically trained chef, and Associate Professor. He is the author of five books, including Culinary Improvisation. Panelists include Annie Hauck-Lawson, Ph.D., R.D. co-editor of Gastropolis. Annie is the president of the Association for the Study of Food and Society, an urban agriculturalist, one of four generations of Brooklyn food growers and gatherers. The ‘food voice’, a term of her origin, is represented in the works of all panelists here. Jessica B. Harris is a culinary historian and cookbook author who focuses on the food and foodways of the African Diaspora. Her forthcoming works include Rum Drinks and High on the Hog: A Culinary Journey from Africa to America. Mark Russ Federman is the third generation owner of Russ & Daughters an appetizing store which has been selling smoked, cured, and pickled fish products on The Lower East Side for approximately 100 years. Annie Lanzillotto, a widely published writer and performance artist wrote a chapter in Gastropolis entitled “Cosa Mangia Oggi” (Thing You Eat Today!) that regales readers with her Bronx Italian food voice journeys. Discussion and book signing to follow.

Sunday, January 31, 5-10pm
Earthquake Relief Benefit Dinner at Palo Santo
652 Union St., Park Slope
Reservations, $50 (718-636-6311)

Chef Jacques Gautier serves a three-course prix-fixe menu of traditional Haitian dishes to raise funds for the Rural Haiti Project which is working to provide relief to those affected by the recent earthquake. Tickets include food, beverage, tax and tip. RSVP by phone to make a reservation: 718-636-6311.
________________________________
Of note a few weeks down the road…

Wednesday, February 3, 4-6pm
Why (and exactly how) New York Simply Loves Italian
NYU Fales Library
70 Washington Square South
Tickets, $10 (RSVP to 212.992.9081 or rsvp.bobst@nyu.edu)

Chris Cannon, Manhattan restaurateur, William Grimes, author and former restaurant critic for The New York Times, Elena Kostioukovitch, author of Why Italians Love to Talk About Food, and Fabio Parasecoli along with moderator Clark Wolf, food and restaurant consultant, talk over New York’s obsession and long-time love of Italian food.

Wednesday, February 3, 10am-12pm
Rally to Legalize Beekeeping in NYC
Just Food
125 Worth St, Rm 330
RSVP, Nadia@justfood.org

As you have probably heard by now, beekeeping is still deemed illegal in our fare city. Along with a committed corps of urban beekeepers and local honey lovers (including some politicians), Just Food has been rallying to turn the tides and make this important practice legal. On Wednesday, February 3, the Department and Board of Health and Mental Hygiene is convening a Public Hearing on the amendment to Health Code 161, in which article 161.01 currently bans beekeeping. Make your opinion heard. Give testimony in support of honeybees and beekeepers in the five boroughs. Oral testimony can be given at the Public Hearing on February 3rd, 10am-12pm at 125 Worth Street, NYC, Room 330. For questions or to RSVP, contact Nadia@justfood.org. For background information on Just Food’s New York City beekeeping campaign, go to http://www.justfood.org/food-justice/campaigns.

Friday, February 5, 8pm
Grub Party at East New York Farms
The United Community Centers
613 New Lots Ave. at the corner of Schenck Ave.
RSVP here

Grub parties bring communities, groups, and organizations together to share a good meal and conversation centered on the theme of local food. Join East New York Farms and friends (including Jin’s Journey, Food Security Roundtable, Malcom X Grassroots Movement, Brooklyn Food Coalition, and United Community Centers) for a potluck Grub dinner on February 5. Bring a dish to share (along with the recipe), as well as a plate, a cup, and your own utensils. Come get your grub on with chefs, cooks, gardeners, food activists, food bloggers and fellow foodies of Brooklyn, and learn what good food initiatives and activities are afoot in our community.

Sunday, February 7, noon-3pm
Basic Urban Bee Keeping Courses
University Settlement at the Houston Street Center
273 Bowery
Registration for four-week course, $100

Let the New York City Beekeeper’s Association help you make good on the sweetest New Year’s resolution possible: let 2010 be the year you become an urban beekeeper. Yes, you! The NYCBA is offering two courses in 2010 for the absolute beginner and novice beekeeper. Each course is 12 hours long, spread out over four Sundays.

The cost of the course is $100.00 for the entire twelve-hour course, all of which goes towards room rental and the NYCBA. NYCBA’s volunteer instructors are professional beekeepers with a collective half century of experience. February classes commence on 2/7, 2/14, 2/21, and 2/28. The second series, in March, will be held on 3/7, 3/14, 3/21, and 3/28.

Wednesday, February 10, 4:30-8:30pm
Our World 2030: Preparing a New Generation for a Sustainable Future
The City College of New York
160 Convent Avenue
Shepard Hall, Room 550
Register here, (the event is free)

This discussion will explore why the economic viability and well-being of every community depends on education for sustainability and the transformation to a green economy. Will examine the critical issues of education and workforce training needed to leverage the emerging green economy—including issues of inclusion that minority populations and communities face in tapping the potential of a sustainable future.

Tuesday, February 16, 6:30-8pm
Eat What You Grow, Grow What You Eat
The Brooklyn Kitchen Labs
100 Frost St., Williamsburg

Rooftop farmer and founder of Growing Chefs, Annie Novak, leads a series of classes at the Brooklyn Kitchen Labs on how to start your own edible urban garden. Over the course of four class sessions she’ll guide students through the necessary winter-time tasks, seed ordering, and plot preparation to make way for a successful growing season ahead. Sign up now as this course is sure to sell out fast!

Thursday, February 18, 6:30pm
Southern Cooking in New York City
The Museum of the City of New York
1220 Fifth Ave.
Reservations required, purchase tickets here

The Museum of the City of New York, in partnership with the Southern Foodways Alliance and Mississippi Development Authority/Division of Tourism, will host a discussion focusing on how The Great Migration transformed the culinary culture of the North. Leading the discussion are Jessica Harris, author of a forthcoming history of African-American foodways, and one of the 50 founders of the Southern Foodways Alliance. In 2007, she took leave from Queens College (where she is a full professor) to assume the Ray Charles Chair at Dillard University in New Orleans. And Ted Lee, one of the James Beard award-winning Charleston Lee brothers. Ted, along with his brother, Matt Lee, is at work on a book of essays about New York City food culture. The work will certainly examine the influence that South Carolina natives have had on New York, but at its core, the book will be a celebration of the multicultural delights of our nation’s culinary capitol. John T Edge will moderate the discussion.

Sunday, February 28, 8:30am-6pm
Just Food’s Annual CSA in NYC Conference
Just Food
Teacher’s College, Columbia University

The great thing about the off season (as it were) is that it gives us all a little down time (or at least time indoors) to plot and plan for the year ahead. Take part in Just Food’s annual CSA in NYC Conference on February 28 to converse with farmers, food activists, and advocates from around the city and state to talk about how to start a CSA, how to strengthen the one you are a part of, issues facing regional farmers, and how we can all maximize our roles in the movement to increase access to locally grown food throughout the city.

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Paté a la Silver Palate


Pate Maison

2 sm Celery ribs with leaves

4 Whole peppercorns

6 c Water

1 ts Salt

1 lb Chicken livers

Tiny pinch of cayenne pepper 1/2 lb (2 sticks) sweet butter

2 ts Dry mustard

1/2 ts Grated nutmeg

1/4 ts Ground cloves

1/4 c Roughly chopped onion

1 sm Garlic clove

1/4 c Calvados

1/2 c Dried currants

1. Add celery and peppercorns to 6 cups water in a saucepan. Add the salt and bring to a boil. Reduce heat and simmer for 10 minutes.

2. Add chicken livers and simmer very gently for about 10 minutes; livers should still be pink inside (slightly).

3. Drain; discard celery and peppercorns, and place livers in the bowl of a food processor fitted with a steel blade. Add remaining ingredients except currants and process until well blended and very smooth.

4. Scrape into a bowl, stir in currants, and transfer pate to a 3-4 cup

crock or terrine. Smooth the top of the pate, cover, and refrigerate at least 4 hours. Allow the pate to stand at room temp for about 30 minutes before serving. About 3 cups pate, or 8+ servings

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1/18/10-1/24/10

Dear Local Gourmands,

I was mixing together chicken livers, butter, and Calvados on Sunday thinking my French grandmother would be very, very pleased with the granddaughter who once upon a time declared vegetarianism. As a child when I refused the liver my parents had prepared for dinner, they called her up long distance from the dinner table so she could lecture me on the high notes of this delicacy. Lecture she did, but converted I was not. And honestly, I haven’t been until this fall when I ventured to the other side at the first brave bite of sweet, rich, totally addictive chicken liver paté. For my birthday dinner I thought this would be just the thing to impress my guests– some old friends, some new– on a rainy Sunday night. And it was! The livers, of course, came from the Fort Greene Greenmarket and at $3 a pound, are one of the cheapest ways to feed your friends some buttery (local) love. For recipe guidance I turned to the Silver Palate Cookbook which notes that once people realize paté is as easy to make as meatloaf, it ought to become just as popular. Their recipe calls for freshly ground nutmeg, cloves, dry mustard, and a whole cup of currants– it’ll turn any non-believers right around.

All the best,
Jeanne

Tuesday, January 19-Saturday, February 13
Cassoulet on the Menu at Savoy
70 Prince St.
Reservations, (212) 219-8570

Ever supportive of local and sustainable food through his work as a restauranteur, Peter Hoffman, chef and owner of Soho’s legendary Savoy, will feature cassoulet on his lunch and dinner menus. On January 23 from 12:30-3:30pm cassoulet enthusiasts can sample seven variations on the classic Southern French dish ($65), or if you’re a curious home cook, a cassoulet class will be offered for $45 on January 30 from 2:30-4:30pm. Proceeds benefit Chef’s Collaborative, an organization which supports sustainable food production by partnering regional farmers with restaurants.

Wednesday, January 20, 6-10pm
Vegetarian Dinner with Sixpoint Beer Pairing
Jimmy’s No. 43
43 E. 7th St.
Tickets, $45 (plus tax and gratuity)

Shane Welch of Red Hook-based Six Point Brewery hosts a five-course vegetarian dinner with local beer pairings.

Thursday, January 21, 6:30pm
Jennifer McLagan: “How Fat Became a Four-Letter Word”
Culinary Historians of New York
Jimmy’s No. 43
43 E. 7th St.
Tickets, $25/members, $40/non-members

This month, the Culinary Historians of New York explore the history of animal fat over the last century, from its loss of status to being perceived as pure evil.

“At the turn of the 20th century lard, tallow, and butter had pride of place in our kitchens. Today they are replaced by “vegetable” oils and we are obsessed with low-fat food. Why? Our food certainly doesn’t taste better and we are not healthier. Who is responsible for this vilification of fat? The US Congress? The medical community? The media? The Duchess of Windsor?

Jennifer McLagan, the author of Fat: An Appreciation of a Misunderstood Ingredient with Recipes, named cookbook of the year by the James Beard Foundation, has been called courageous, contrarian, and even a little crazy. Join her for a discussion of why animal fat is important in our diet and why we should be eschewing anything low fat or fat-free. Learn to embrace butter, lard, and suet! Jennifer will challenge your relationship to fat and she’ll have you going back for seconds on the fatty treats we’ll be serving.”

Saturday, January 23, 6-11pm
Third Annual Pie Contest
K&M Bar
225 N. 8th St., Williamsburg
Suggested donation, $5

Whether you crave savory snacks or sweets, the annual Pie Contest at K&M bar is sure to lure you back for second and thirds. Weigh in on your favorite combination in the People’s Choice category, or drop off your own best rendition of the classic American dessert at 5:30. Guidelines follow:

a. The crust is homemade.

b. It’s not a pizza pie

c. you bring a modestly sized place card with a description of the pie ONLY written on it

Proceeds from the Contest benefit BK Farmyards.

Sunday, January 24 1:30pm
The Dynamic Gastropolis
Brooklyn Public Library, Dweck Center
Grand Army Plaza

Annie Hauck-Lawson leads a reading and discussion on the history and culture of food in New York City based on her book, Gastropolis: Food and New York City. Panelists include city-based food writers and scholars Andrew F. Smith, Cara De Silva, and Janet Poppendieck.
________________________________
Of note a few weeks down the road…

Monday, January 25, 6-9pm
Good Spirits at Almond
Almond
12 E. 22nd St.
Tickets, $40

Edible Manhattan and Brooklyn hosts their first annual cocktail party at Almond restaurant on 22rd St. Six local restaurants will pair food with six cocktails, including one made with the amazing local Tuthilltown hooch, another created with Rhum J.M. from Martinique, a beery quaff made with Heartland Brewery’s new keg series, a grapey mixer with Wolffer Estate Vineyards verjus, a concoction mixed with Dallis Coffee elixir, and more. Space is limited, so purchase tix now. Enter the code “cocktail” and the hosts will include a one-year subscription to Edible Manhattan for free.

Thursday, January 28, 6:30pm
Foodie Book Club: The Jungle
The Brooklyn Kitchen
616 Lorimer St., Williamsburg

The Brooklyn Kitchen kicks off this year’s Foodie Book Club series with a discussion of Upton Sinclair’s The Jungle. “Published in 1906, this seminal work was written to highlight the plight of the working class and to remove from obscurity the corruption of the American meatpacking industry during the early 20th century.” Bring a dish to share, ’cause naturally the Foodie Book Club doubles as a pot luck.

Sunday, January 31, 1-5pm
The Brooklyn Taco Experiment
The Bell House
149 7th St., Gowanus
Tickets, (advance) $20, (at the door) $25

Nick Suarez and Theo Peck of the Food Experiments bring on the next installment in their series of home cooking competitions with the Brooklyn Taco Experiment. Bring your best to the Bell House and show Brooklyn what you got going in your taco: enter the competition here. Tortillas will be provided to chefs by Tortilleria Chinantla. The judging panel includes Andrew Knowlton (Bon Appetit and Iron Chef judge), Cesar Fuentes (Executive Director of the Food Vendor’s Committee of Red Hook Park), Dave Vendley (Calexico), and Brandon Gillis (Bark Hot Dogs). Needless to say, the eating will be good, the competition fierce, the afterparty hot. A portion of the proceeds will benefit research for Ovarian Cancer.

Sunday, January 31, 1:30pm
Gastropolis: Finding Your Food ‘Voice’
Brooklyn Public Library, Dweck Center
Grand Army Plaza

Jonathan Deutsch, Ph.D. leads a discussion on the ways in which food conveys meaning and aspects of New York City Cultural identities. Deutsch is co-editor of Gastropolis, a classically trained chef, and Associate Professor. He is the author of five books, including Culinary Improvisation. Panelists include Annie Hauck-Lawson, Ph.D., R.D. co-editor of Gastropolis. Annie is the president of the Association for the Study of Food and Society, an urban agriculturalist, one of four generations of Brooklyn food growers and gatherers. The ‘food voice’, a term of her origin, is represented in the works of all panelists here. Jessica B. Harris, a culinary historian & cookbook author who focuses on the food & foodways of the African Diaspora. Her forthcoming works include Rum Drinks and High on the Hog: A Culinary Journey from Africa to America. Mark Russ Federman is the third generation owner of Russ & Daughters an appetizing store which has been selling smoked, cured, and pickled fish products on The Lower East Side for approximately 100 years. Annie Lanzillotto, a widely published writer and performance artist wrote a chapter in Gastropolis entitled “Cosa Mangia Oggi” (Thing You Eat Today!) that regales readers with her Bronx Italian food voice journeys. Discussion and book signing to follow the discussion.

Sunday, February 7, noon-3pm
Basic Urban Bee Keeping Courses
University Settlement at the Houston Street Center
273 Bowery
Registration for four-week course, $100

Let the New York City Beekeeper’s Association help you make good on the sweetest New Year’s resolution possible: let 2010 be the year you become an urban beekeeper. Yes, you! The NYCBA is offering two courses in 2010 for the absolute beginner and novice beekeeper. Each course is 12 hours long, spread out over four Sundays.

The cost of the course is $100.00 for the entire twelve-hour course, all of which goes towards room rental and the NYCBA. NYCBA’s volunteer instructors are professional beekeepers with a collective half century of experience. February classes commence on 2/7, 2/14, 2/21, and 2/28. The second series, in March, will be held on 3/7, 3/14, 3/21, and 3/28.

Tuesday, February 16, 6:30-8pm
Eat What You Grow, Grow What You Eat
The Brooklyn Kitchen Labs
100 Frost St., Williamsburg

Rooftop farmer and founder of Growing Chefs, Annie Novak, leads a series of classes at the Brooklyn Kitchen Labs on how to start your own edible urban garden. Over the course of four class sessions she’ll guide students through the necessary winter-time tasks, seed ordering, and plot preparation to make way for a successful growing season ahead. Sign up now as this course is sure to sell out fast!

Read Full Post »

1/11/10-1/17/10

Dear Local Gourmands,

Sure the 79º weather and carne asada tacos of L.A. are hard to beat (not to mention the lemon trees laden with fruit), but I’m a northeast girl at heart, and I do love the cold. The cold, of course, means that the markets have slimmed way down for the next few months, but that just makes the search for good foodie finds more of an adventure. New York welcomed me home this past week with plenty of edible treasures that made me smile, despite my chattering teeth: dehydrated herbs (thyme, chives, cilantro, and more) for sale from Stannard Farms at the Upper West Side Greenmarket, sustainably caught Maine shrimp, monkfish, and perch for sale at the Meat Hook, greenhouse-grown arugula, fresh parsley, and knock out gingerbread cakes at the new indoor market at the Old American Can Factory, a stellar shrimp roll from the Brooklyn Lobster Pound at the Brooklyn Flea’s new digs in the clock tower at One Hanson Place, and black-as-the-night radishes courtesy Revolution Organics who were hustling hard core in freezing temps on Saturday at Grand Army Plaza. When not searching for provisions, the cold keeps us inside, leaving plenty of time to cook. This week the Underground Food Collective does wintry food justice by putting on a series of locally sourced suppers in celebration of a return to the root cellar.

Eat your beets, stay warm, and stay healthy,
Jeanne

Tuesday, January 12, 7-11pm
Sixpoint Beer Dinner
Broadway East
171 E. Broadway (btwn. Jefferson and Rutgers Sts.
Reservations, $40

Get your local buzz on at this veg-friendly prix-fixe dinner featuring pairings with an array of Red Hood brewed Sixpoint suds. Each of the four courses will be matched up with a Sixpoint gem– braised short ribs with Righteous Ale, par example– and to be sure, each course has a flexible meat/vegetarian option to keep everyone in check.

Wednesday, January 13, 5:30-7:30pm
Evenings with Agriculture 2.0
Black Door
127 W. 26th St., near Sixth Ave.
Tickets, $10 in advance, $20 at the door

Meet and mingle with other folks in the local, sustainable food and agriculture community in the city at the first event in an on-going series of monthly meet-ups. Whether you are looking to learn more about regional farming, want to meet fellow farmers, are navigating a career in sustainable agriculture, or working to get a food business idea off the ground, this is the place to connect with others and swap ideas and advice. Hosted by Janine Yorio and Bailey Stoler (NewSeed Advistors), Holley Atkinson, Josh Dorf (Stone-Buhr Flour), Jeremy Hirsch (J.B. Hirsch & Associates), Joshua Levin (GoodEater.org), and Jen Small (Flying Pigs Farm), with special guests Ian Cheney and Kurt Ellis (King Corn and Truck Farm).

Thursday, January 14, 15, or 17 7:30-10:30pm
Underground Food Collective Presents: A Dinner in Celebration of Winter
Location address e-mailed with purchase of ticket
Tickets, $65

Just because the markets thin out in the winter doesn’t mean that radishes, sweet potatoes, apples, and squash are to be marginalized– hardly! The Underground Food Collective proves this by serving a feast of plates piled high with winter delicacies. Let the folks at the Meat Hook, the Brooklyn Kitchen Labs, and Kelly Geary of Sweet Deliverance remind you of all the edible reasons to be thankful for theses chilly months.

Thursday, January 14, 6:30-8:30pm
Winter Market Dinner
Rose Water
787 Union St., Park Slope
Reservations, Slow Food member $60, non-member $70

Rose Water’s Chef John Tucker invites diners to a communal table for a seasonal three-course meal featuring local winter ingredients (yes, the peaches may be gone, but I swear there’s plenty of goodness to be found in sweet potatoes, onions, and apples at the Greenmarket) along with wine pairings.

Thursday, January 14, 6:30pm
Curry Economics: Food as a Driving Force of Economic Development
American Museum of Natural History
Enter at 77th St., Kaufmann Theatre, first floor
Tickets, $15

Journalist Sasha Issenberg, author of the Sushi Economy, moderates a discussion about food as the driving force behind economic expansion, industrial development, and geopolitical competition at the American Museum of Natural History. Panelists include Tom Standage, business affairs editor of The Economist and author of An Edible History of Humanity; Eric Tagliacozzo, associate professor of history at Cornell University and author of Secret Trades, Porous Borders: Smuggling and States Along a Southeast Asian Frontier; and award-winning culinary expert Julie Sahni, author of the seminal Classic Indian Cooking.

Saturday, January 16, 1-5pm
Cassoulet Cookoff
Jimmy’s No. 43
43 E. 7th St.
Tickets, $20 (at the door)

The second annual Cassoulet Cookoff at Jimmy’s No. 43 makes January in New York remarkably more bearable– at least for one afternoon. Pile into the back room at the East Village gastro pub to sample five cassoulets put forth by amateurs, cook-off celebs, and chefs alike. Judges include chef Matt Weingarten and others, as well as you, the chilly, must-be-warmed-by-fatty-goodness, enthusiastic cassoulet consumer.

All week leading up to this event, Jimmy’s No. 43 features Greenmarket farmer’s sausages on the menu alongside German beers from B United Imports like Reissdorf Kolsch and Schlenkerla Helles Lager lightly smoked.

Saturday, January 16, 6:30pm
Pickle Make and Take Salon
Soho address revealed with purchase of ticket
Tickets, $50
RSVP amenyc@earthlink.net or deena@stitch-lab.com

Nancy Ralph, director of the NY Food Museum (famous for its International Pickle Day fest on the Lower East side each fall), and Annie Hauk-Lawson, co-author of Gastropolis and kapusta-making master, lead the way through a winter night of pickle making and munching on sours from cultures and traditions around the world. Seasonal dinner and dessert served along with potato vodka and sweet potato sochu. Guests are encouraged to bring along a bottle of wine and a poem about pickles to share with all. To reserve a seat e-mail amenyc@earthlink.net or
deena@stitch-lab.com.

Sunday, January 17, 11am-5pm
Indoor Farmer’s Market
Old American Can Factory
232 Third St. at the corner of Third Ave., Gowanus

Find vendors from the lovely 5th Ave. Sunday market in the Old American Can Factory, their new digs for the winter. Shop for Orwasher’s bread (second to none!), cheese from Valley Shepard Creamery, and fresh produce from several regional farmers, among other purveyors. I stopped in yesterday on my bike to give my fingers a thaw and was thrilled to find fresh arugula, parsley, apple cider, ginger bread cakes and pickles. Alongside the food market is a collection of artists who work in the OACF who sell hand made soap, wool caps, and jewelery.
_________________________________
Of note a few weeks down the road…

Wednesday, January 20, 6-10pm
Vegetarian Dinner with Sixpoint Beer Pairing
Jimmy’s No. 43
43 E. 7th St.
Tickets, $45 (plus tax and gratuity)

Shane Welch of Red Hook-based Six Point Brewery hosts a five-course vegetarian dinner with local beer pairings.

Thursday, January 21, 6:30pm
Jennifer McLagan: “How Fat Became a Four-Letter Word”
Culinary Historians of New York
Jimmy’s No. 43
43 E. 7th St.
Tickets, $25/members, $40/non-members

This month, the Culinary Historians of New York explore the history of animal fat over the last century, from its loss of status to being perceived as pure evil.

“At the turn of the 20th century lard, tallow, and butter had pride of place in our kitchens. Today they are replaced by “vegetable” oils and we are obsessed with low-fat food. Why? Our food certainly doesn’t taste better and we are not healthier. Who is responsible for this vilification of fat? The US Congress? The medical community? The media? The Duchess of Windsor?

Jennifer McLagan, the author of Fat: An Appreciation of a Misunderstood Ingredient with Recipes, named cookbook of the year by the James Beard Foundation, has been called courageous, contrarian, and even a little crazy. Join her for a discussion of why animal fat is important in our diet and why we should be eschewing anything low fat or fat-free. Learn to embrace butter, lard, and suet! Jennifer will challenge your relationship to fat and she’ll have you going back for seconds on the fatty treats we’ll be serving.”

Saturday, January 23, 6-11pm
Third Annual Pie Contest
K&M Bar
225 N. 8th St., Williamsburg
Suggested donation, $5

Whether you crave savory snacks or sweets, the annual Pie Contest at K&M bar is sure to lure you back for second and thirds. Weigh in on your favorite combination in the People’s Choice category, or drop off your own best rendition of the classic American dessert at 5:30. Guidelines follow:

a. The crust is homemade.

b. It’s not a pizza pie

c. you bring a modestly sized place card with a description of the pie ONLY written on it

Proceeds from the Contest benefit BK Farmyards.

Monday, January 25, 7pm
Growing Chefs Benefit
Galapagos Art Space
16 Main St., at the corner of Water St., DUMBO
Tickets, $12-$20 sliding scale at the door

In the life of a farmer, the summer is for growing, but the winter is for plotting. Rooftop farmer Annie Novak’s other project, Growing Chefs: Food Education from Field to Fork, throws a benefit party at Galapagos Art Space to raise funds for their innovative programming around food education for New York City Youth. Join a reunion of old friends from the Eagle St. Rooftop Farm and urban agriculture projects from across the boroughs that connect us all to upstate agriculture with our locally grown efforts. It’s a winter gathering for the city mouse/country mouse! Local, wintry vegetarian food prepared with produce from upstate and down, bands, and an auction to boot! Raise a fork and look forward to the season ahead.

Monday, January 25, 6-9pm
Good Spirits at Almond
Almond
12 E. 22nd St.
Tickets, $40

Edible Manhattan and Brooklyn hosts their first annual cocktail party at Almond restaurant on 22rd St. Six local restaurants will pair food with six cocktails, including one made with the amazing local Tuthilltown hooch, another created with Rhum J.M. from Martinique, a beery quaff made with Heartland Brewery’s new keg series, a grapey mixer with Wolffer Estate Vineyards verjus, a concoction mixed with Dallis Coffee elixir, and more. Space is limited, so purchase tix now. Enter the code “cocktail” and the hosts will include a one-year subscription to Edible Manhattan for free.

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1/4/10-1/10/10

Dear Local Gourmands,

Happy New Year! I hope you all enjoyed plenty of greens, beans, and pork to welcome success and prosperity in 2010. Or maybe you celebrated on January 1 with a bowl of Pumpkin soup for Haiti’s independence, or slurped long, long noodles for longevity (of course), or by eating little rounds of anything really– I suppose rounds of sausage would work as well as carrots– to represent coins.

I’ve been charmed with the chance to spend the first few days of the new year in sunny L.A. where the local specialties span tacos, hot pastrami, funky Thai mango and crab salad, and Armenian donuts. I’m going to pack a suitcase full of Meyer lemons before my return, and hope that their vitamins suffice for sunshine through what is meant to be a very snowy January. Luckily when I get back to New York there will be plenty of chances to stay warm with friends at the cassoulet cook-off, a pie contest, and a cocktail event among others…read on, and see you soon!

Jeanne

Monday, January 4, 7-8:30pm
Smoked Food and Drink
Beer Table
427 B 7th Avenue
Tickets, $35

Chris Munsey (once a cheese maven for Murray’s, and now on-board with Dickson’s Farmstand Meats), shares his knowledge of smoked foods at Beer Table. Gather round for pours of a special keg of Schlenkerla Oak Smoke– a perfect pairing to go along with some smokey snacks and discussion.

Thursday, January 7, 7pm
Word of Mouth: Online Media and the Future of Food Writing
Housing Works
126 Crosby

Housing Works kicks off their new food-centric lit series with a conversation that focuses on food writing in new media. Thursday’s panel features Julie Powell, Amanda Hesser, Merrill Stubbs, Ed Levine, Cathy Erway, and moderator Lynn Andriani.

Friday, January 8-Sunday, January 10
Inaugural Williamsburg Cask Fest
dba Brooklyn
113 North 7th Street, Williamsburg

At their annual Cask Fest, d.b.a. promises to tap into (at least!) 12 rare cask-contained beers of various styles all at once. The bar defines cask ale as “Unfiltered, unpasteurized beer brewed only from traditional ingredients, matured by secondary fermentation in the container from which it is dispensed, and served without the use of extraneous carbon dioxide and served at cellar temperature (about 54F), so cool but not chilled (NOT room temperature). Cask Ale is also known as ‘Cask-Conditioned Beer’, and ‘Real Ale’. It is beer as it was invented to be, basically, before modern chilled, filtered, and force-carbonated beers took over the mainstream and deposed the original, old-school methods for the sake of convenience and increased profit (of big brewers) through standardisation.”

Saturday, January 9, 7pm-2am
NYC Benefit for the Queer Farmer Film Project
1399 Pacific St., btwn New York and Brooklyn Aves

The Queer Farmer Film project is swinging through New York. View a trailer for this film-in-the-works and show your support at a party to raise a little dough for its completion. Cocktail and hors d’oevres hour at 7pm, followed a screening at 8pm, then bands and dancing into the night. Appetizers provided by Ash Fulk, NYC’s most recent Top Chef. Gay and hetero farmers as (and all other farmy folk) welcome!

Sunday, January 10, 7pm
Regeneration Farming
Blue Stockings
172 Allen St. btwn Stanton and Rivington
Suggested donation, $5

Come out for a presentation and discussion of regenerative farming in the Hudson Valley with Kevin Skvorak and Sarah Williford of Regeneration Community Shared Agriculture. They’ll detail their permaculture practices and discuss ecological health, climate change, and long term food-security in the Hudson Valley.
________________________________
Of note a few weeks down the road…

Tuesday, January 12, 7-11pm
Sixpoint Beer Dinner
Broadway East
171 E. Broadway (btwn. Jefferson and Rutgers Sts.)
Reservations, $40

Get your local buzz on at this veg-friendly prix-fixe dinner featuring pairings with an array of Red Hood brewed Sixpoint suds. Each of the four courses will be matched up with a Sixpoint gem– braised short ribs with Righteous Ale, par example– and to be sure, each course has a flexible meat/vegetarian option to keep everyone in check.

Thursday, January 14, 6:30-8:30pm
Winter Market Dinner
Rose Water
787 Union St., Park Slope
Reservations, Slow Food member $60, non-member $70

Rose Water’s Chef John Tucker invites diners to a communal table for a seasonal three-course meal featuring local winter ingredients (yes, the peaches may be gone, but I swear there’s plenty of goodness to be found in sweet potatoes, onions, and apples at the Greenmarket) along with wine pairings.

Thursday, January 14, 6:30pm
Curry Economics: Food as a Driving Force of Economic Development
American Museum of Natural History
Enter at 77th St., Kaufmann Theatre, first floor
Tickets, $15

Journalist Sasha Issenberg, author of the Sushi Economy, moderates a discussion about food as the driving force behind economic expansion, industrial development, and geopolitical competition at the American Museum of Natural History. Panelists include Tom Standage, business affairs editor of The Economist and author of An Edible History of Humanity; Eric Tagliacozzo, associate professor of history at Cornell University and author of Secret Trades, Porous Borders: Smuggling and States Along a Southeast Asian Frontier; and award-winning culinary expert Julie Sahni, author of the seminal Classic Indian Cooking.

Saturday, January 16, 1-5pm
Cassoulet Cookoff
Jimmy’s No. 43
43 E. 7th St.
Tickets, $20 (at the door)

The second annual Cassoulet Cookoff at Jimmy’s No. 43 makes January in New York remarkably more bearable– at least for one afternoon. Pile into the back room at the East Village gastro pub to sample five cassoulets put forth by amateurs, cook-off celebs, and chefs alike. Judges include chef Matt Weingarten and others, as well as you, the chilly, must-be-warmed-by-fatty-goodness, enthusiastic cassoulet consumer.

All week leading up to this event, Jimmy’s No. 43 features Greenmarket farmer’s sausages on the menu alongside German beers from B United Imports like Reissdorf Kolsch and Schlenkerla Helles Lager lightly smoked.

Wednesday, January 20, 6-10pm
Vegetarian Dinner with Sixpoint Beer Pairing
Jimmy’s No. 43
43 E. 7th St.
Tickets, $45 (plus tax and gratuity)

Shane Welch of Red Hook-based Six Point Brewery hosts a five-course vegetarian dinner with local beer pairings.

Saturday, January 23, 6-11pm
Third Annual Pie Contest
K&M Bar
225 N. 8th St., Williamsburg
Suggested donation, $5

Whether you crave savory snacks or sweets, the annual Pie Contest at K&M bar is sure to lure you back for second and thirds. Weigh in on your favorite combination in the People’s Choice category, or drop off your own best rendition of the classic American dessert at 5:30. Guidelines follow:

a. The crust is homemade.

b. It’s not a pizza pie

c. you bring a modestly sized place card with a description of the pie ONLY written on it

Proceeds from the Contest benefit BK Farmyards.

Monday, January 25, 6-9pm
Good Spirits at Almond
Almond
12 E. 22nd St.
Tickets, $40

On January 25, 2010, Edible Manhattan and Brooklyn hosts their first annual cocktail party at Almond restaurant on 22rd St. Six local restaurants will pair food with six cocktails, including one made with the amazing local Tuthilltown hooch, another created with Rhum J.M. from Martinique, a beery quaff made with Heartland Brewery’s new keg series, a grapey mixer with Wolffer Estate Vineyards verjus, a concoction mixed with Dallis Coffee elixir, and more. Space is limited, so purchase tix now. Enter the code “cocktail” and the hosts will include a one-year subscription to Edible Manhattan for free.

Read Full Post »