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Archive for February, 2009

Dear Local Gourmands,

Isn’t this just the heart of February? Just when you think you can tuck away the winter coat for good, a harsh wind picks up outta nowhere and buttons you right back into place. And so, we’ve got a few more weeks to revel in comfort food and wool socks, and everything that comes with being cooped up when it’s too cold to go outside. But we’re getting antsy. I’ve been noticing that out of antsiness comes creativity. Lately I’ve been consumed by incredible civic actions happening all around me– serious meetings to organize for the legalization of keeping bees in the city (sign the petition here), CSA enrollment, the ever-so-committed planning sessions for the Brooklyn Food Conference that will take place in May. Last weekend’s fund-raiser for the New Amsterdam Public was a smash hit, and over hometown brews and plenty of oyster shells, all kinds of foodie schemes were revealed for the months ahead. Eventually we will put those coats in the closet for good and unleash ourselves to the rooftop gardens — we might even wish we’d had a few more weeks to plan. Enjoy the celery roots while they last…soon enough we won’t just be dreaming of greens anymore.

From my soup pot to yours,
Jeanne

P.S. Happy Mardi Gras!

Open through May 3
Over Spilt Milk
NY Food Museum at the City Reliquary
The City Reliquary
370 Metropolitan Ave.
Brooklyn, NY 11211

The visionary Nancy Ralph, director of the roaming NY Food Museum, has brought us pickles and preserves, tours of Brooklyn candy factories and now– just in time for the whispered conversations about where to get a good source for the still-illicit out-of-state raw milk that are sweeping the city’s dining rooms this year– you can visit the museum’s site for a healthy drop of history to go with your café au lait. “Over Spilt Milk,” an exhibition that will be housed through May 3 at the City Reliquary in Williamsburg, exposes the long story of where milk sold in the city has traditionally come from and how the heck it got to be so expensive.

Tuesday, February 24, noon
Mark Bittman on the Leonard Lopate Show
WNYC, 93.9FM

Leonard Lopate hosts Mark Bittman whose new book, Food Matters, gets beyond the minimalist fare, and on to the larger issues that come up when we explore where the food on our table is coming from, how it got here, and who produced it for us.

Tuesday, February 24,
%10 Night at Jimmy’s No. 43
Food Systems Network NYC
43 E. 7th St.

“Food Systems Network NYC is a membership based organization designed to foster communication and cultivate community amongst various stake holders and professionals working across the food system. Members gather monthly for Open Networking meetings to encourage collaboration; share information; discuss public policy; and promote opportunities for individuals to partner on specific projects. We are pleased to launch our website to better fulfill our mission and to provide tools for our members to share resources and grow stronger.” Have a beer and some mid-week nibbles at Jimmy’s No. 43 to help support the good work this organization is doing in the community.

Wednesday, February 25, 6:30pm
“Pork Bellies: The Secret Financial Life of Your Food” lecture by Kara Newman
Culinary Historians of New York
Jimmy’s No. 43
43 East 7th Street, Downstairs (btwn 2nd/3rd Aves)
Note: this venue is NOT handicap-accessible; it’s down a steep flight of stairs.Fee: $40 Non-Members and Guests | $25 CHNY Members | $22 CHNY Student & Senior Members
**MUST reserve in advance

Join the Culinary Historians of New York at Jimmy’s No. 43 Kara Newman’s lecture “Pork Bellies: The Secret Financial Life of Your Food.” It seems hard to find a menu in this city that doesn’t feature pork belly these days, and as far as I’m concerned, that’s not a bad thing at all. Newman, who has written on both food and the economy for the last decade, will shed a light on how the cut got its name and saved the Chicago Merchantile Exchange from near-extinction. From curbside trading in the late 1800s to heritage pig breeds that are all the rage, Newman will examine the history of this favored piggy product.

Friday, February 27, 6:30-8:30pm
Chefs and Their Publics
Dan Barber, Heather Carlucci-Rodriguez, Bret Thorn, and Frederick Kaufman
Menus in the Media Working Group
20 Cooper Square, 5th Floor, Institute for Public Knowledge

“This event is part of Menus in the Media, a 2008-2009 working group that aims to study the culture of cooking by bridging the traditional barriers between serious scholarship and purveyors of popular culture, while recognizing the limits of both. Menus in the Media is directed by Krishnendu Ray, assistant professor in the department of nutrition, food studies and public health at NYU, and it is sponsored by the Institute for Public Knowledge.”

Saturday, February 28, 2-3:30pm
The Educated Eater: Urban Farms
CENYC at First Presbyterian Church, 12th St & 5th Avenue, Manhattan
Tickets $5 (which includes Greenmarket snacks and New York State wine)

“Did you know there are eggs and wheatgrass from Brooklyn, rooftop beehives in the Bronx, a thriving 2.5 acre community farm in Red Hook and livestock roaming on 47 acres in Queens? These are just a few examples of what urban pioneers are doing to revive agriculture in the city. Join us for an engaging conversation with leaders and innovators in the urban agriculture movement followed by a Q&A, moderated by Greenmarket Director and Co-founder of Added Value (Red Hook Community Farm), Michael Hurwitz. Panelists include Greenmarket farmer and wheatgrass grower Stewart Borowsky of Greener Pastures, Greenmarket farmer and beekeeper David Graves of Berkshire Berries, Greenmarket farmer Michael Robertson of Queens County Farm Museum, Dan Wood of Work Architecture Company and Red Hook egg farmers Maria Mackin & Declan Walsh.”

__________________________________
Of note a few weeks down the road…


March 4, 7-9:30pm
Mari Fujii Visits Counter
Counter
105 1st Ave
jcca-america.org

“Chef Mari Fujii is one of the foremost practitioners of Shojin-Ryouri, the traditional vegetarian cooking in Japan’s Buddhist temples. Mari runs a cooking school with her husband, a Buddist monk, where she teaches classic dishes created with wild greens, seaweed, tofu, and produce from local farmers. She is also an expert in Chinese-style temple food and yakuzen, a type of Chinese cooking which uses ingredients with medicinal properties. Counter is proud to host Mari’s first appearance in New York City on Wednesday March 4th from 7:00 to 9:30 pm. The four-course meal is $50, with an additional $15 for a drink pairing; telephone 212-982-5870 for reservations. Proceeds from the evening will benefit the Japanese Culinary and Cultural Association of America (JCCA-AMERICA), exempt under section 501 (c) (3).”

Saturday, March 7, 1-4pm
Past, Present, and Future of Food: Bushwick, Brooklyn
Brooklyn Public Library Bushwick Brooklyn
340 Bushwick Avenue, L train to Montrose stop

As part of the Arts in Bushwick SITE Festival, this self-described “A(n Urban) (Farm) Salon” will explore the history of how Bushwick went from being the agricultural supply for New York City to drying up into the food desert it is today. “We’ll talk about what people can and ARE doing to grow food here. We have rooftops, streets, empty lots, and plenty of light. We have water. What can we grow? What would happen if we ripped up Metropolitan Avenue and planted corn and potatoes? What would happen to the community? The price of homes? Could we raise fish in English Kills? Would people in Woodhull Hospital benefit fig trees in front of the building? Would juvenile crime decrease if teens had beans and beets to take care of or knew how to make bread out of the wheat they grew?” Come talk with your neighbors, share some eats, and discuss the possibilities.

Sunday, March 8, 10am-6pm
CSA in NYC Annual Conference
Just Food
Teachers College
Register on-line now!

“The Just Food Community Supported Agriculture (CSA) in NYC Conference is an opportunity for CSA members from around the city and farmers to come together for a day of workshops and discussion. This year’s guest speaker is black-dirt farmer and MacArthur “Genius Award” Winner Cheryl Rogowski as our Keynote Speaker. Rogowski is, as cited by the MacArthur officials, “an entrepreneur who has revitalized the character of family farming as a commercial enterprise and as an engine of community development.” For more, visit THE BLACK DIRT BLOG, or tune in to her radio program on WTBQ.”

Saturday, March 14, 5pm
Spring Benefit Dinner and Rabbit Raising for the
Queens County Farm Museum
Tickets $95

“This event, taking place just before the Vernal Equinox, will gather diners to celebrate the arrival of spring and the success of the coming season on the farm. Guests are invited to arrive early to tour the farm and attend a free field workshop on pasture-raising rabbits with farmer Julie Engel, and then settle into a cozy five-course supper amongst the many farmhouse fireplaces. Farmer Julie Engel will provide her pasture-raised rabbit, raised with a unique system unlike any other in the US. QCFM Farmer Michael Grady Robertson will provide pork, eggs, vegetables, and honey all produced on-site at the Queens County Farm Museum. Dinner will be served by the GradyWood supper club team and NY State wines will be poured throughout the evening.”

Monday, March 23, 6pm
Michael Pollan
“From the Garden onto the Plate: One Writer’s Path”
Columbia University Low Rotunda
116th St. and Broadway

“He has been called a “post-wilderness nature writer” for his articles and books about the messy places where the natural and human worlds intersect – places like the garden, buildings, domesticated plants and agriculture. In his talk, he will trace the path of his writing from his graduate school encounters (here at Columbia) with Thoreau and Emerson through his work on the ecology and politics of eating.”

Read Full Post »

Dear Local Gourmands,

Hunting around for recipes that might offer creative ways to cook parsnips, I came across an ode to the sweet tuber that was published in the Times in 1917. “In Praise of the Parsnip”— it’ll make you smile. The author writes about how easy it is to grow parsnips, arguing that it only takes a pinch of seed to grow a bounty of “the healthiest root vegetable.” The dated letter, typed in wobbly rows of print, rings of character. But the produce-possessed farmer really doesn’t sound so dated to me. In 2009, nearly a century later, there’s a rumbling in this city of people who want to get back to growing their own food, or at least want to buy it from people who have tended the crops nearby. This Saturday there’s a fundraiser for the New Amsterdam Public, a project that aims to re-establish the market down on the seaport that was once the epicenter of the City. In early March join like-minded local foodies to figure out where all the farmland went in Bushwick, and what is being done to bring back growth, one fire escape-raised tomato plant at a time. I found a post on Craigslist recently that advertised a room for rent, so long as you’re okay with the rooftop honey bees the owners have ordered for the spring. Things are on the up and up, recession be damned. The goodness of the parsnip persists.

All the best,
Jeanne

Tuesday, February 17, 7pm
Sixpoint Craft Ales Birthday Fete
Barcade
388 Union Ave., Williamsburg

Fun with the boys– play old school arcade games and drink up til the brew is gone. It’s the birthday of our fave local Brooklyn brewery– come celebrate!

Wednesday, February 18, 6:30-8:30pm
Gastronomica Forum: Feast for the Eyes
Astor Center
Tickets $25
“What happens when food and marketing collide? And what happens when an artist turns her critical gaze onto this collision? In the cheeky installation piece Genealogy of the Supermarket, artist Nina Katchadourian identifies relationships between mass-market brands, connecting characters (such as the Quaker Oats Man and Aunt Jemima) who stand in for common products from the grocery store. Each iconic face is treated to its own frame and all are laid out in a large family tree. In creating these relationships she raises questions about heritage, lineage and how ethnicity equates authenticity in the way we interact with both food and packaging; she also delights us with playful combinations and juxtaposition of some of our most “beloved” brands.”

Wednesday, February 18, 7:30-9:30pm
Public Forum on the Global Food Crisis: Food, Fuel, and Finance
NYU at Rudin Family Forum
295 Lafayette Street (Second Floor), in the Puck Building,
at the corner of Lafayette and Houston

Speakers Frances Moore Lappé (author of Diet for a Small Planet and co-founder of Small Planet Institute), Walden Bello (Focus on the Global South), and Barry Gills (editor, Journal of Peasant Studies) converge to address the global food crisis.

Friday, February 20, 7-9pm
The Oiling of America
Community Church of New York, 40 East 35th St
(between Park and Madison Avenues)
Tickets: $20, pre-registration is suggested
For more information, contact Claudia Keel claudia@wprice-nyc.org

Sally Fallon is the founding president of the Weston A. Price Foundation, a nonprofit nutrition education foundation that provides science based information on nutrition, cholesterol and dietary fats. She is the author of the best selling cookbook, ‘Nourishing Traditions’ and ‘Eat Fat, Lose Fat,’ both with Mary G. Enig, PhD, the first scientist to warn the public about the dangers of trans fatty acids. In this lecture she will dispel myths and feed facts on heart disease, get at the nitty-gritty behind-the-scenes of the veggie power industry, and clue us in on why traditional foods not only taste just right to us, but why they are also “critical to our health.”

Friday, February 20, 8pm
Du-licious Special
Concurrent with Dubai Underground at Like the Spice Gallery
224 Roebling St.

“Our dinners always offer you a night that’s positively soaked in art, as well as food. As you dine you’ll enjoy a discussion about the culture and concepts of Dubai, the new place-to-be for the up-and-coming. We’ll also have some of the artists in attendance to discuss their work and influences, which may not always be immediately apparent to the Western mindset. Served family style in the gallery itself, our dinner series is designed to let you enjoy a scrumptious meal while having a thoughtful conversation with strangers. Let yourself be inspired together by the beautiful work covering our walls. Just $45 per person covers dinner, drinks and entertainment. Dinner is served at 8:00pm.”

Saturday, February 21, 2pm
Beekeepers Meet Up Honey Tasting
Basis
466 Broome Street 2nd floor (Another Anomaly)

Come for the Second Annual Honey-Tasting and hear a speaker from East New York Farms tell about the good work they’re doing, including beekeeping! Bring a jar of your own or your favorite honey to share

Saturday, February 21, 5-8pm
Founded on Oyster Shells
New Amsterdam Public
f/ocus Rental Gallery
599 11th Avenue

“In this year 2009 New Amsterdam Market will begin meeting every month, thus laying the foundation for a permanent institution. By holding these markets in a civic venue, we seek to revive New York’s rich and storied legacy of public market halls, where the city established food policy while furthering economic development.” The project to return this public market space to its original purpose– an open place of commerce where New Yorkers flocked to buy food– is well underway. Purchase tickets now for a dinner of fish and chips and winter ‘kraut.

Sunday, February 22, 7:30pm
Natural Wine Dinner at the Roebling Tea Room

Jenny and Francoise Selections have joined forces with the Roebling Tea Room and Brooklyn Based to offer inspired pairings of natural wines with courses upon courses of a hearty winter meal. Two dinners have been scheduled, each will feature five wines. The winemakers (hailing from the Loire Valley and Burgundy) will join the party at the table, the cooks will bring you raw scallops, glazed ribs, a cheese plate, and many courses in between. Have no shame in eating and drinking your way through February with this crowd, but be sure to book in advance.
_________________________________
Of note a few weeks down the road…

Wednesday, February 25, 6:30pm
“Pork Bellies: The Secret Financial Life of Your Food”
lecture by Kara Newman

Culinary Historians of New York
Jimmy’s No. 43
43 East 7th Street, Downstairs (btwn 2nd/3rd Aves)
Note: this venue is NOT handicap-accessible; it’s down a steep flight of stairs.
Fee: $40 Non-Members and Guests | $25 CHNY Members | $22 CHNY Student & Senior Members
**MUST reserve in advance

Join the Culinary Historians of New York at Jimmy’s No. 43 Kara Newman’s lecture “Pork Bellies: The Secret Financial Life of Your Food.” It seems hard to find a menu in this city that doesn’t feature pork belly these days, and as far as I’m concerned, that’s not a bad thing at all. Newman, who has written on both food and the economy for the last decade, will shed a light on how the cut got its name and saved the Chicago Merchantile Exchange from near-extinction. From curbside trading in the late 1800s to heritage pig breeds that are all the rage, Newman will examine the history of this favored piggy product.

Friday, February 27, 6:30-8:30pm
Chefs and Their Publics
Dan Barber, Heather Carlucci-Rodriguez, Bret Thorn, and Frederick Kaufman
Menus in the Media Working Group
20 Cooper Square, 5th Floor, Institute for Public Knowledge

“This event is part of Menus in the Media, a 2008-2009 working group that aims to study the culture of cooking by bridging the traditional barriers between serious scholarship and purveyors of popular culture, while recognizing the limits of both. Menus in the Media is directed by Krishnendu Ray, assistant professor in the department of nutrition, food studies and public health at NYU, and it is sponsored by the Institute for Public Knowledge.”

Saturday, February 28, 2-3:30pm
The Educated Eater
CENYC at First Presbyterian Church, 12th St & 5th Avenue, Manhattan
Tickets $5 (includes Greenmarket snacks and New York State wine)

“Did you know there are eggs and wheatgrass from Brooklyn, rooftop beehives in the Bronx, a thriving 2.5 acre community farm in Red Hook and livestock roaming on 47 acres in Queens? These are just a few examples of what urban pioneers are doing to revive agriculture in the city. Join us for an engaging conversation with leaders and innovators in the urban agriculture movement followed by a Q&A, moderated by Greenmarket Director and Co-founder of Added Value (Red Hook Community Farm), Michael Hurwitz. Panelists include Greenmarket farmer and wheatgrass grower Stewart Borowsky of Greener Pastures, Greenmarket farmer and beekeeper David Graves of Berkshire Berries, Greenmarket farmer Michael Robertson of Queens County Farm Museum, Dan Wood of Work Architecture Company and Red Hook egg farmers Maria Mackin & Declan Walsh.”

March 4, 7-9:30pm
Mari Fujii Visits Counter
Counter
105 1st Ave
jcca-america.org

“Chef Mari Fujii is one of the foremost practitioners of Shojin-Ryouri, the traditional vegetarian cooking in Japan’s Buddhist temples. Mari runs a cooking school with her husband, a Buddist monk, where she teaches classic dishes created with wild greens, seaweed, tofu, and produce from local farmers. She is also an expert in Chinese-style temple food and yakuzen, a type of Chinese cooking which uses ingredients with medicinal properties. Counter is proud to host Mari’s first appearance in New York City on Wednesday March 4th from 7:00 to 9:30 pm. The four-course meal is $50, with an additional $15 for a drink pairing; telephone 212-982-5870 for reservations. Proceeds from the evening will benefit the Japanese Culinary and Cultural Association of America (JCCA-AMERICA), exempt under section 501 (c) (3).”

Saturday, March 7, 1-4pm
Past, Present, and Future of Food: Bushwick, Brooklyn
Brooklyn Public Library Bushwick Brooklyn
340 Bushwick Avenue, L train to Montrose stop

As part of the Arts in Bushwick SITE Festival, this self-described “A(n Urban) (Farm) Salon” will explore the history of how Bushwick went from being the agricultural supply for New York City to drying up into the food desert it is today. “We’ll talk about what people can and ARE doing to grow food here. We have rooftops, streets, empty lots, and plenty of light. We have water. What can we grow? What would happen if we ripped up Metropolitan Avenue and planted corn and potatoes? What would happen to the community? The price of homes? Could we raise fish in English Kills? Would people in Woodhull Hospital benefit fig trees in front of the building? Would juvenile crime decrease if teens had beans and beets to take care of or knew how to make bread out of the wheat they grew?” Come talk with your neighbors, share some eats, and discuss the possibilities.

Sunday, March 8, 10am-6pm
CSA in NYC Annual Conference
Just Food
Teachers College

“The Just Food Community Supported Agriculture (CSA) in NYC Conference is an opportunity for CSA members from around the city and farmers to come together for a day of workshops and discussion. This year’s guest speaker is black-dirt farmer and MacArthur “Genius Award” Winner Cheryl Rogowski as our Keynote Speaker. Rogowski is, as cited by the MacArthur officials, “an entrepreneur who has revitalized the character of family farming as a commercial enterprise and as an engine of community development.” For more, visit THE BLACK DIRT BLOG, or tune in to her radio program on WTBQ.”

Monday, March 23, 6pm
Michael Pollan
“From the Garden onto the Plate: One Writer’s Path”
Columbia University Low Rotunda
116th St. and Broadway

“He has been called a “post-wilderness nature writer” for his articles and books about the messy places where the natural and human worlds intersect – places like the garden, buildings, domesticated plants and agriculture. In his talk, he will trace the path of his writing from his graduate school encounters (here at Columbia) with Thoreau and Emerson through his work on the ecology and politics of eating.”

Read Full Post »

Dear Local Gourmands,

Chocolate is lovely (and NY mag has a very solid round up of local chocolatiers to pay a visit to this week, and every week if you were to ask me) but libraries don’t melt in your mouth– they’re built to last. As I was looking around for food events happening in the coming weeks, I was floored by how many great lectures and library series are in the pipeline. In discouraging times, it’s very hopeful to see some of the city’s most looked-to institutions acting as platforms where we can gather to carry on this important discussion about food, and where we’re headed as a society who will always be ready to eat.

Many chocolate-covered salty caramels to you all,
Jeanne

Tuesday, February 10, 6-8pm
The Roundtable of Food Professionals–NYC
The Fales Library
Elmer Holmes Bobst Library, Third Floor
70 Washington Square South New York, NY 10012
RSVP to 212.992.9018 or rsvp.bobst@nyu.edu

The Roundtable of Food Professionals (Formerly the Roundtable for Women in Food Service, Inc. ) and The Fales Library at New York University cordially invite you to a reception celebrating the donation of the Roundtable’s Archive to the Food Studies Collection at NYU.

Wednesday, February 11, 6:30-8:30pm
Slow U: Chocolates, Bean to Bar…Locally?
Astor Center
Slow Food NYC with Kathy Moskal

Kathy Moskal, the founder and owner of Vere (pronounced very) Chocolate, started making chocolate when a good friend, ill as a consequence of diabetes, craved chocolates. “The ‘diabetic’ kinds are awful,” Kathy says, “so, I decided to make my own.” Kathy’s chocolates are always dark, low in sugar, and high in taste and antioxidants. She acquires sustainably produced cocoa beans at the source in Ecuador. Her chocolate bars are made there, at the source, enabling money to stay in the local economy. Partially processed cocoa is shipped to her plant in the Chelsea neighborhood of Manhattan where she produces artisanal chocolates. With comparatively few food miles logged on her chocolates, they are a small carbon footprint alternative for chocolate lovers. Just in time for Valentine’s Day, Kathy will explain her philosophy, walk us through her production processes, and lead us through a tasting of her extraordinary chocolates.

Wednesday, February 11, 6:30-9:30pm
TastebudsNYC
Drop Off Service
211 Ave. A btwn. 13th and 14th Streets

It’s been a while since we have had one of our Happy Food Hours (aka potlucks). With the teeth-chattering weather out there, it seems like the perfect time to enjoy some conviviality around food. This time of year I think of roasted root veggies, warm bread pudding, chicken pot pie…Tastebuds is a community for those in the food biz and those of us who just love food. Whether you work behind the scenes on food security issues, toil at the sauce station, are planning the next Farm to Table, or regularly use “grassy” and other snobby adjectives to describe your favorite cheese, this is your opportunity to expand your network and community. We meet the 2nd Wednesday of every month. For more information visit our website: http://www.tastebudsnyc.com/.

Thursday, February 12, 2:15-6:30pm
Organic Food in the US & Europe: Comparative Perspectives, Practices, and Flavors
NYU Casa Italiana Zerilli-Marimo
24 W. 12th St.

An afternoon of comparisons between European and American organic certification, distribution, and an Italian chef’s point of view offer insight into how different “organic” can be from one continent to the next.
_______________________________
Of note a few weeks down the road…

Wednesday, February 18, 6:30-8:30pm
Gastronomica Forum: Feast for the Eyes
Astor Center
Tickets $25

What happens when food and marketing collide? And what happens when an artist turns her critical gaze onto this collision? In the cheeky installation piece Genealogy of the Supermarket, artist Nina Katchadourian identifies relationships between mass-market brands, connecting characters (such as the Quaker Oats Man and Aunt Jemima) who stand in for common products from the grocery store. Each iconic face is treated to its own frame and all are laid out in a large family tree. In creating these relationships she raises questions about heritage, lineage and how ethnicity equates authenticity in the way we interact with both food and packaging; she also delights us with playful combinations and juxtaposition of some of our most “beloved” brands.

Wednesday, February 18, 7:30-9:30pm
Public Forum on the Global Food Crisis: Food, Fuel, and Finance
NYU at Rudin Family Forum
295 Lafayette Street (Second Floor), in the Puck Building,
at the corner of Lafayette and Houston

Speakers Frances Moore Lappé (author of Diet for a Small Planet and co-founder of Small Planet Institute), Walden Bello (Focus on the Global South), and Barry Gills (editor, Journal of Peasant Studies) converge to address the global food crisis.

Friday, February 20, 7-9pm
The Oiling of America
Community Church of New York, 40 East 35th St
(between Park and Madison Avenues)
Tickets: $20, pre-registration is suggested
For more information, contact Claudia Keel claudia@wprice-nyc.org

Sally Fallon is the founding president of the Weston A. Price Foundation, a nonprofit nutrition education foundation that provides science based information on nutrition, cholesterol and dietary fats. She is the author of the best selling cookbook, ‘Nourishing Traditions’ and ‘Eat Fat, Lose Fat,’ both with Mary G. Enig, PhD, the first scientist to warn the public about the dangers of trans fatty acids. In this lecture she will dispel myths and feed facts on heart disease, get at the nitty-gritty behind-the-scenes of the veggie power industry, and clue us in on why traditional foods not only taste just right to us, but why they are also “critical to our health.”

Saturday, February 21, 2pm
Beekeepers Meet Up Honey Tasting
Basis
466 Broome Street 2nd floor (Another Anomaly)

Come for the Second Annual Honey-Tasting and hear a speaker from East New York Farms tell about the good work they’re doing, including beekeeping! Bring a jar of your own or your favorite honey to share

Saturday, February 21, 5-8pm
Founded on Oyster Shells
New Amsterdam Public
f/ocus Rental Gallery
599 11th Avenue

“In this year 2009 New Amsterdam Market will begin meeting every month, thus laying the foundation for a permanent institution. By holding these markets in a civic venue, we seek to revive New York’s rich and storied legacy of public market halls, where the city established food policy while furthering economic development.” The project to return this public market space to its original purpose– an open place of commerce where New Yorkers flocked to buy food– is well underway. Purchase tickets now for a dinner of fish and chips and winter ‘kraut.

Wednesday, February 25, 6:30pm
“Pork Bellies: The Secret Financial Life of Your Food” lecture by Kara Newman
Culinary Historians of New York
Jimmy’s No. 43
43 East 7th Street, Downstairs (betw 2nd/3rd Aves)
Note: this venue is NOT handicap-accessible; it’s down a steep flight of stairs.
Fee: $40 Non-Members and Guests | $25 CHNY Members | $22 CHNY Student & Senior Members
**MUST reserve in advance

Join the Culinary Historians of New York at Jimmy’s No. 43 Kara Newman’s lecture “Pork Bellies: The Secret Financial Life of Your Food.” It seems hard to find a menu in this city that doesn’t feature pork belly these days, and as far as I’m concerned, that’s not a bad thing at all. Newman, who has written on both food and the economy for the last decade, will shed a light on how the cut got its name and saved the Chicago Merchantile Exchange from near-extinction. From curbside trading in the late 1800s to heritage pig breeds that are all the rage, Newman will examine the history of this favored piggy product.

Friday, February 27, 6:30-8:30pm
Chefs and Their Publics
Dan Barber, Heather Carlucci-Rodriguez, Bret Thorn, and Frederick Kaufman
Menus in the Media Working Group
20 Cooper Square, 5th Floor, Institute for Public Knowledge

“This event is part of Menus in the Media, a 2008-2009 working group that aims to study the culture of cooking by bridging the traditional barriers between serious scholarship and purveyors of popular culture, while recognizing the limits of both. Menus in the Media is directed by Krishnendu Ray, assistant professor in the department of nutrition, food studies and public health at NYU, and it is sponsored by the Institute for Public Knowledge.”

March 4, 7-9:30pm
Mari Fujii Visits Counter
Counter
105 1st Ave
jcca-america.org

Chef Mari Fujii is one of the foremost practitioners of Shojin-Ryouri, the traditional vegetarian cooking in Japan’s Buddhist temples. Mari runs a cooking school with her husband, a Buddist monk, where she teaches classic dishes created with wild greens, seaweed, tofu, and produce from local farmers. She is also an expert in Chinese-style temple food and yakuzen, a type of Chinese cooking which uses ingredients with medicinal properties. Counter is proud to host Mari’s first appearance in New York City on Wednesday March 4th from 7:00 to 9:30 pm. The four-course meal is $50, with an additional $15 for a drink pairing; telephone 212-982-5870 for reservations. Proceeds from the evening will benefit the Japanese Culinary and Cultural Association of America (JCCA-AMERICA), exempt under section 501 (c) (3).

Sunday, March 8, 10am-6pm
CSA in NYC Annual Conference
Just Food
Teachers College

The Just Food Community Supported Agriculture (CSA) in NYC Conference is an opportunity for CSA members from around the city and farmers to come together for a day of workshops and discussion. This year’s guest speaker is black-dirt farmer and MacArthur “Genius Award” Winner Cheryl Rogowski as our Keynote Speaker. Rogowski is, as cited by the MacArthur officials, “an entrepreneur who has revitalized the character of family farming as a commercial enterprise and as an engine of community development.” For more, visit THE BLACK DIRT BLOG, or tune in to her radio program on WTBQ.

Read Full Post »

Dear Local Gourmands,

This weekend I discovered some golden market treasures to tide me over during these weeks of endless sweet potatoes: in the middle of winter, on a day when I was bundled in two coats, Wilklow Orchards was selling frozen raspberries and Revolution Organics had portions of frozen heirloom tomatoes just waiting for this tomato-starved girl to scoop them up. Oh for the love of sweet, acidic, red fruit! A little taste of July in February makes my world go ’round.

May your cheeks be rosy and your apple cider piping hot,
Jeanne

Monday, February 2-Saturday, February 28
Pancake Month at Clinton Street Baking Company

The groundhog saw his shadow today which means six more weeks of winter, and if the news just makes you want to crawl back under the covers and hide, non-stop pancakes may be the only thing to lure you out into society. Clinton Street Baking Company has declared February Pancake Month, in celebration of which they are rolling out new combinations of crafty ‘cakes every few days. A stack of candied blood orange with bittersweet chocolate flapjacks will be well worth the effort it takes to bundle up and go out for breakfast.

Monday, February 2-Wednesday, February 11
Kumquat Cupcakery Valentines Day Orders for Just Food

This year Kumquat is very happy to announce that %10 of the proceeds of Valentine’s Day orders will be donated to Just Food NYC. “Just Food is a non-profit organization that works to develop a just and sustainable food system in the New York City region. We do this by fostering new marketing and food-growing opportunities that address the needs of regional, rural family farms, NYC community gardeners, and NYC communities.”

Tuesday, February 3, 7:30-9:30pm
Winter Dinner at Green Table
Slow Food New York
Cleaver Company in Chelsea Market
Click here to reserve tickets

Mary Cleaver is a New York City pioneer of sustainable cuisine. Her catering company, The Cleaver Co., and her Snail of Approval winning restaurant, The Green Table, are renowned for turning regionally produced, seasonal ingredients into extraordinary meals. She is a board member of Farm to Chef, a farmer/chef owned business delivering sustainably and humanely produced food from upstate New York to New York City Chefs. Mary invites you to join her and her staff for a meatless dinner, a model of slow, delicious, budget-stretching cuisine, celebrating our regional bounty of winter provender. You will get “hands-on” in The Cleaver Co. kitchen, helping prepare your dinner, and then sit down in The Green Table dining room for a family style meal of Winter Salad, Vegetable Gumbo, Corn Bread, Dessert, and wine and cider.

Wednesday, February 4, noon
Beard on Books with Joyce Goldstein
James Beard Foundation

Cookbook author and JBF Award winner Joyce Goldstein’s latest title, Mediterranean Fresh, offers a collection of authentic recipes for delicious salads, antipasti, and meze. Goldstein puts her own spin on classics like panzanella, but also includes surprises like tunisian cauliflower, artichoke, and potato salad and a Middle Eastern burger. With an entire chapter devoted to versatile sauces and dressings, there’s the freedom to mix and match mains and accessories. Nimble and casual in its approach, Mediterranean Fresh sends you on a choose-your-own-adventure in the kitchen.

Wednesday, February 4, 7pm
Writing in the Café
Symphony Space

The Hungarian Pastry Shop, a cozy bakery café in Morningside Heights, is the site where Nathan Englander (The Ministry of Special Cases), Julie Otsuka (When the Emperor Was Divine), and Rivka Galchen (Atmospheric Disturbances) met and became friends and where they write. Each of them will introduce a story of his or her own.

Sunday, February 8, 6pm
Lucky Dog Fundraiser at Applewood
$20 per person includes admission and hors d’oeuvres
full cash bar available

In an effort to save the family farm, friends are pulling together a fundraiser at Applewood on Sunday night to pool some money for Lucky Dog Farm, an honest-as-they-come vegetable farm in the Catskills whose rented land is suddenly up for sale. It’s the same story, told so many times– “some of the land the farm rents is up for sale. With flat land being scarce in the Catskills, odds are high that it will go for some sort of non-farm use. While the farm can’t afford to purchase the land, it turns out that a state grant would pay the landowner for the development rights to the land — creating an easement that would forever keep the land agricultural. But…. the grant only covers some of the cost to purchase the development rights…” so Applewood is hosting this fundraiser and auction to help rally the greenbacks in favor of, well, preserving a space to grow our dearly beloved greens.
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Of note a few weeks down the road…

Wednesday, February 11, 6:30-8:30pm
Slow U: Chocolates, Bean to Bar…Locally?
Astor Center
Slow Food NYC with Kathy Moskal

Kathy Moskal, the founder and owner of Vere (pronounced very) Chocolate, started making chocolate when a good friend, ill as a consequence of diabetes, craved chocolates. “The ‘diabetic’ kinds are awful,” Kathy says, “so, I decided to make my own.” Kathy’s chocolates are always dark, low in sugar, and high in taste and antioxidants. She acquires sustainably produced cocoa beans at the source in Ecuador. Her chocolate bars are made there, at the source, enabling money to stay in the local economy. Partially processed cocoa is shipped to her plant in the Chelsea neighborhood of Manhattan where she produces artisanal chocolates. With comparatively few food miles logged on her chocolates, they are a small carbon footprint alternative for chocolate lovers. Just in time for Valentine’s Day, Kathy will explain her philosophy, walk us through her production processes, and lead us through a tasting of her extraordinary chocolates.

Wednesday, February 18, 6:30-8:30pm
Gastronomica Forum: Feast for the Eyes
Astor Center
Tickets $25

What happens when food and marketing collide? And what happens when an artist turns her critical gaze onto this collision? In the cheeky installation piece Genealogy of the Supermarket, artist Nina Katchadourian identifies relationships between mass-market brands, connecting characters (such as the Quaker Oats Man and Aunt Jemima) who stand in for common products from the grocery store. Each iconic face is treated to its own frame and all are laid out in a large family tree. In creating these relationships she raises questions about heritage, lineage and how ethnicity equates authenticity in the way we interact with both food and packaging; she also delights us with playful combinations and juxtaposition of some of our most “beloved” brands.

Saturday, February 21, 5-9pm
New Amsterdam Public fundraising event

“In this year 2009 New Amsterdam Market will begin meeting every month, thus laying the foundation for a permanent institution. By holding these markets in a civic venue, we seek to revive New York’s rich and storied legacy of public market halls, where the city established food policy while furthering economic development.” The project to return this public market space to its original purpose– an open place of commerce where New Yorkers flocked to buy food– is well underway. Find out more at www.newamsterdampublic.org, and stay tuned for information about this upcoming fundraiser.

Sunday, March 8, 10am-6pm
CSA in NYC Annual Conference
Just Food
Teachers College

The Just Food Community Supported Agriculture (CSA) in NYC Conference is an opportunity for CSA members from around the city and farmers to come together for a day of workshops and discussion. This year’s guest speaker is black-dirt farmer and MacArthur “Genius Award” Winner Cheryl Rogowski as our Keynote Speaker. Rogowski is, as cited by the MacArthur officials, “an entrepreneur who has revitalized the character of family farming as a commercial enterprise and as an engine of community development.” For more, visit THE BLACK DIRT BLOG, or tune in to her radio program on WTBQ.

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