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Dear Local Gourmands,

I met my friend Will by the cauliflower at the market on Saturday. He was picking up a head of Bill Maxwell’s finest, and asked me about the difference between those with green florets and the heads with traditional white ones. Will, who sells fish and is my go-to source for directions on cooking fluke and tuna and the best treatment for razor clams, looked skeptical of the whole lot. I told him the only way to find out would be to cook them both and see for himself– at this time of year, I can never get enough. Until November, I forget how much I adore cauliflower, and then the leaves begin to fall off, and the daylight changes, and I become obsessed with thinking of Thanksgiving dishes. Why wait until then to begin with the sides? I fancy my cauliflower roasted until a little caramelized on the edges with garlicky, cheesy breadcrumbs on top. Cream of cauliflower soup is also not a bad way to go. Luckily Bill Maxwell will be at the market for a few more weeks (including a special appearance at a Wednesday edition of the Grand Army Plaza Greenmarket the Wednesday before Thanksgiving) before he and his vegetables go on hiatus for winter vacation.

All best,
Jeanne

Monday, November 15
Farm School Applications Due
Mail in your applications to join the first class of the new found urban farming educational program, Farm School. Farm School NYC aims to increase the self-reliance of communities and inspire positive local action around issues of food access and social, economic and racial justice by providing comprehensive professional training in urban agriculture for NYC residents.

Monday, November 15, 6:30pm–8:30pm

Home Bakers Meet-up
The New Amsterdam Market School
224 Front St., between Beekman and Peck Slip
Admission is free, but you must reserve a ticket in advance

Break bread with fellow bakers at the kick-off party for Grains Week! Admission to this bread-based gathering is a loaf of your favorite home baked bread and a copy of your recipe. Bakers of all experience levels are welcome to swap samples with fellow grain geeks, tell stories about overactive yeast, or share secrets on how to get a really crusty crust. Take a crack at cranking the Greenmarket butter churn, sample bread baked with flour from Greenmarket vendors, and bring your recipe and/or starter to trade with others.

Tuesday, November 16, 12:30-2pm
Food Systems Network Open Networking Meeting
121 Ave of the Americas, 6th fl
Join fellow local food activists at the monthly Food Systems Network open networking meeting to share and hear updates about various projects and initiatives that colleagues are working on around the city. United Neighborhood Houses’ Healthy Communities Through Healthy Food will be the focus of the November meeting. A $5 donation is suggested, though no one will be turned away for lack of funds. Avoid the fee by becoming a FSNYC member now! Visit: http://foodsystemsnyc.org/joinnow

Wednesday, November 17, 6–8pm
The Educated Eater: Regionally Grown Grain

The New School
Wollman Hall
65 West 11th St., 5th floor
Admission, free for students, $5 for general public
Tickets can be purchased at The New School box office, 212.229.5488 or boxoffice@newschool.edu

You might weigh in heavily when it comes to your preference for butter, crisco, or lard in pie crusts, but do you ever wonder where the flour you use to roll out your perfect dough comes from, or how it might affect the quality of your pie? How would emmer pasta taste? What kind of home baked bread would locally grown spelt flour produce? In this edition of Greenmarket’s quarterly panel discussion series, The Educated Eater, talk turns to regionally grown grain. Hear from a culinary historian, a grower, a miller, a baker, and a chef about the past, present, and future of grains grown in the Northeast. Greenmarket’s June Russell moderates a discussion that explores the challenges and developments that will advance the availability and volume of local grains to the bakers, brewers, distillers, and chefs in our area.

Panelists:

Nathan Leamy—Watson Fellow, home baker, and global grains expert
Don Lewis—Miller and Baker, Wild Hive Farm
Anton Earnhardt—Grower, Lightning Tree Farm
Michael Anthony—Chef, Gramercy Tavern
June Russell, moderator—Farm Inspections Manager, Greenmarket

Wednesday, November 17, 6:30-8:30pm
Media, Advocacy, and Dialogue
Anna-Maria and Stephen Kellen Gallery
66 Fifth Avenue at 13th Street

Increasing media attention to urban agriculture has mirrored the public’s growing interest in the topic. At the same time, food activists have used the media in creative ways to advance support for urban agriculture. Moderated by food writer Andy Smith, this panel focuses on the relationship between media, advocacy, and the urban agriculture movement. The panel includes an artist and filmmaker, the producer of an internet broadcast network focusing on urban farming, an organizer of a farm boot camp for urban chefs, an expert on the internet and agriculture, and the publisher of a food magazineAndy Smith moderates this panel that includes Ian Cheney, Erin Fairbanks, Tom Grace, Katy Keiffer, and Gabrielle Langholtz.

Wednesday, November 17, 6-9pm
Family-style Beer Dinner at Inside Park at St. Bart’s
109 E. 50th St.
Tickets, $55

Join Edible Manhattan for a 3-course family-style beer dinner at Inside Park at St. Bart’s featuring Stella Artois, Leffe and Hoegaarden beers. This collaborative dinner will feature 3 courses served family-style throughout the dining room, each inspired by a different film from the good folks at the NYC Food Film Festival, including “Mr. Okra”, “The Perfect Oyster”, and “Buttermilk: It Can Help”. Inside Park Dinner, of course, will be paired with the evening’s films: Chef Matthew Weingarten will serve wood-roasted oysters and an okra and housemade sausage jambalaya. And there will be veggies a plenty–also in honor of “Mr. Okra”–and “a buttermilk something” to finish. NYC Food Film Festival director George Motz, as well as Edible editor Brian Halweil, will be on hand to introduce the meal. All guests will also receive a one-year subscription to Edible Manhattan.

Wednesday, November 17, 6-9pm
Queens Eats
The Foundry
42-38 9th St., Long Island City
Tickets, $30 tasting, or $50 tasting with open bar

The Queens Harvest Food Co-op hosts a tasting of event showcasing dishes from some of Queens’ finest: Agnanti, Astor Bake Shop, Bareburger, Cream Bakery, De Mole, LIC Market, M. Wells, Sage Testaccio, Vesta, and more.

Saturday, November 202pm-4pm
Bread Baking with Ancient Wheat
The Brooklyn Kitchen: 100 Frost St.
Admission, $40 – tickets available here

Join Eli Rogosa on a culinary journey through the history of wheat from einkorn domesticated in Mesopotamia and emmer used in the original matzah, to the evolution of wheat in early Europe. Participants will bake sourdough einkorn bagels made with einkorn malt, einkorn flatbread spiced with Jerusalem zataar, and sprouted einkorn bread.

Saturday, November 20
Giving Thanks Dinner with Eagle St. Rooftop Farm

The Brooklyn Kitchen
100 Frost St., Williamsburg
Tickets, $65

Give thanks to the hands that fed us all season long with produce from the Eagle Street Rooftop Farm. Join friends and fellow farmers at this harvest meal and thanks giving party hosted by the Brooklyn Kitchen.

Sunday, November 21, 11am-1pm
Pancake Breakfast at New Amsterdam Market
New Amsterdam Market
South St. between Beekman St. and Peck Slip
Admission, $20 per plate

We’ll be flipping flapjacks on Sunday morning, at the culmination of a very grainy week—join us for pancakes, grits, and sausage as the sun comes up over the East River. Sample buckwheat, spelt, and good old fashioned (white and whole wheat) pancakes with a helping of local cornmeal grits on the side. Breakfast sausage and maple syrup sweeten the deal. All proceeds benefit New Amsterdam Market, the Organic Growers’ Research and Information-sharing Network, and The Heritage Wheat Conservancy.

Sunday, November 21, 4pm
Brooklyn Chili Take-down

The Bell House
149 7th St., Gowanus

The original Brooklyn Chili Take-down sweeps the borough once again! Expect more than 30 different pots of chili for the tasting– from beef to veggie and back again, this is the cook-off show that started them all.
_________________________________
Of note a few weeks down the road…

Tuesday, November 30, 7-10pm
The Piglet: Tournament of the Cookbooks
92nd St Y
Tickets, $38
The 16 most notable cookbooks of 2010 will go head-to-head in a bracketed competition, vying for the coveted Piglet trophy. Hosted by food52.com, the tournament will feature 17 top food writers and chefs as judges. Tournament rounds will play out over the course of 3 weeks, with a decision announced every weekday beginning November 9, 2010. The Tournament of Cookbooks will culminate in a celebratory event on November 30, 2010, held from 7-10pm at the 92YTribeca in New York City. The winner of the tournament will be announced, and the event will include a panel discussion on “Food Porn.” Panelists will include Frank Bruni, Frank Falcinelli, Ben Leventhal and Chris Cosentino, and editors from the New York Times Magazine will curate a food photo slideshow. Food and drink will be provided by Hanna Winery, Kelso of Brooklyn, Liddabit Sweets, Mexicue, Nuts + Nuts, Van Leeuwen, Dorie Greenspan, Rick’s Picks, Theo Peck and others. A portion of the tickets will be reserved for the public and sold in advance, with a percentage of the proceeds going to Wellness in the Schools. Click here to see the list of cookbooks and judges for this year’s coveted piglet prize.

Dear Local Gourmands,

Last week I made my first voyage to Ellis Island for the launch party to celebrate Molly O’Neill’s triumphant collection, One Big Table. As I stood on the deck of the ferry, pulling away from the city, my imagination wandered off to my great grandmother Ida Bernstein who came to this country alone at the age of 16. I of course never met her, but I do wonder about her every time I find myself on Hester Street where she eventually settled. I’ll think about her while shopping in the Sweet Life for licorice, or while picking up dumplings in the neighborhood, and wonder what she ate when she first arrived in New York.
One of my earliest food memories from the city is the rice pudding my dad learned to make while working as a cook at the Gloucester House, an old Midtown seafood restaurant that is now long gone. We still make the pudding though– when I go home to Michigan, or once when my parents came to visit me and a house full of college friends in a summer sublet out in Oakland.
I just so happened to be reading O’Neill’s 1997 work, A Well-Seasoned Appetite, when she contacted me out of the blue this past May. It took me a minute to believe the very author whose name presided on my bedside table was now in fact asking me to contribute a recipe to her current project, a community cookbook of family recipes from across the nation. I’m so pleased to be nestled there on page 744, rice pudding, family story and all amidst the terrific company of home cooks from coast to coast.
Molly, thanks so much for inviting me to the table!

Best,
Jeanne

Wednesday, November 10, 6:30-8:30pm
Innovations in Urban Agriculture
Anna-Maria and Stephen Kellen Gallery,
Sheila C. Johnson Design Center
2 West 13th St
Free 

This panel consists of creative agricultural entrepreneurs who are designing integrated composting, aquaculture, and vegetable growing systems, aggregated networks of backyard gardens, rooftop farms, and hydroponic growing systems on contaminated industrial sites.  John Ameroso, an expert on urban agriculture who has advised urban farmers for more than three decades as Cornell’s extension agent in New York City, moderates a panel discussion on the possibilities of these innovative forms of urban agriculture practices. Speakers include Erika Allen, Ben Flanner, Stacey Murphy, and Mary Seton Corboy.

Thursday, November 11, 6:30pm
Quiches, Kugels, and Couscous: In Search of the Food of the Jews of France with Joan Nathan
Culinary Historians of New York
7 West 83rd St, btwn Central Park West and Columbus
Tickets, $40 non-members and guests, $25 CHNY/CRS members
What is Jewish cooking in France? In a journey that was a labor of love, Joan Nathan traveled the country to discover the answer and, along the way, unearthed a treasure trove of recipes and the often moving stories behind them for her new cookbook, Quiches, Kugels, and Couscous. Join the Culinary Historians of New York as Nathan travels into kitchens in Paris, Alsace, and the Loire Valley, visits the bustling Belleville market in Little Tunis in Paris, and breaks bread with Jewish families around the observation of the Sabbath and the celebration of special holidays. All across France, she finds that Jewish cooking is more alive than ever: traditional dishes are honored, yet have acquired a certain French finesse. And completing the circle of influences: following Algerian independence, there has been a huge wave of Jewish immigrants from North Africa, whose hot flavors and Sephardic elegance have infiltrated contemporary French cooking. Join the Culinary Historians of New York as Joan Nathan shares the history, the recipes, and the stories from her newest book on the foods of the Jews of France. The reception will feature dishes from the book, and books will be available for purchase and signing. Please note: photo ID is required for entry at Congregation Rodeph Sholom.

Saturday, November 13, 9:30pm
The Farmer and the Horse
The Tank
354 W. 45th St.
Tickets, $10 at the door or on thefarmerandthehorse.com
Catch the New York City premiere of The Farmer and the Horse, a documentary that follows three young farmers as they learn to farm with giant draft horses instead of tractors. Award-winning journalist Jared Flesher presents The Farmer and the Horse, a new film that digs into difficult questions about sustainability, self-sufficiency, and why we do the work we do. Flesher’s film goes beyond the usual platitudes of smiling organic farmers talking about the good life. Farming is grueling work and it’s hard to make a living — especially if you don’t use a tractor.

Saturday, November 13, 6-10pm
Innaugural Hattie Carthan Farmy Folks Soiree Fundraiser
Clifton Pl. at Marcy Ave. (next to the Hattie Carthan Garden)
Tickets, $25

Yonnette Flemming, matriarch of of the Hattie Carthan community garden and market, cooks up a fall harvest feast for “farmy folks.” Food, films, and music will make for a lively family event, which will also honor those who have helped the garden become a positive center of community spirit.

Sunday, November 14, 11am-4pm
Rye Bread and Scandinavian Sandwiches at the New Amsterdam Market 
New Amsterdam Market
South St. between Beekman St. and Peck Slip

A 21 foot long wooden table will be set with more than 10 varieties of smørrebrød created by visiting Danish chef Trina Hahnemann and local chefsAlejandro Alcocer of greenbrownorange; Caroline Fidanza of Saltie; Christophe Hille of Northern Spy Food Co.; Simo Kuusisto of Nordic Breads; and the team from Marlow and Daughters.  All  sandwiches will be made with rugbrød baked by Nordic Breads using regional grain grown and milled by Cayuga Pure Organics of Trumansburg, NY, and topped with regional ingredients, following the norms set by Chef Hahnemann.

Sunday, November 14, 1-4pm
2nd Annual Brooklyn Pie Bake-off
Spacecraft
355 Bedford Ave.
Tickets, $10

The Brooklyn Pie Bake-Off Benefit is a yearly Brooklyn based pie bake-off that raises money for local underfunded non-profits. There are only two rules for the Annual Pie Bake-Off Benefit.  Rule One is that all pie crust must be homemade.  Rule Two is that at least one ingredient must be local(our “local” is defined as being grown or produced within a 200 mile radius of Brooklyn). To wash down each slice we will have milk from Ronnybrook and beer fromBrooklyn Brewery. Entry to the event is $10 and includes free drinks and three pie slice tickets.  Additional pie slice tickets can be had for $1 each.  Bakers receive FREE admission.  Bakers are required to bring two(2) pies to ensure that there is enough to go around.  If you would like to compete, please RSVP by Friday, November 12th, with your name, pie, and local ingredient to: brooklynpiebake@gmail.com.
_________________________________
Of note a few weeks down the road…


Monday, November 15
Farm School Applications Due
Mail in your applications to join the first class of the new found urban farming educational program, Farm School. Farm School NYC aims to increase the self-reliance of communities and inspire positive local action around issues of food access and social, economic and racial justice by providing comprehensive professional training in urban agriculture for NYC residents.

Monday, November 15, 6:30pm–8:30pm

Home Bakers Meet-up
The New Amsterdam Market School
224 Front St., between Beekman and Peck Slip
Admission is free, but you must reserve a ticket in advance

Break bread with fellow bakers at the kick-off party for Grains Week! Admission to this bread-based gathering is a loaf of your favorite home baked bread and a copy of your recipe. Bakers of all experience levels are welcome to swap samples with fellow grain geeks, tell stories about overactive yeast, or share secrets on how to get a really crusty crust. Take a crack at cranking the Greenmarket butter churn, sample bread baked with flour from Greenmarket vendors, and bring your recipe and/or starter to trade with others.

Tuesday, November 16, 12:30-2pm
Food Systems Network Open Networking Meeting
121 Ave of the Americas, 6th fl
Join fellow local food activists at the monthly Food Systems Network open networking meeting to share and hear updates about various projects and initiatives that colleagues are working on around the city. A $5 donation is suggested, though no one will be turned away for lack of funds. Avoid the fee by becoming a FSNYC member now! Visit: http://foodsystemsnyc.org/joinnow

Wednesday, November 17, 6–8pm
The Educated Eater: Regionally Grown Grain

The New School
Wollman Hall
65 West 11th St., 5th floor
Admission, free for students, $5 for general public
Tickets can be purchased at The New School box office, 212.229.5488 or boxoffice@newschool.edu

You might weigh in heavily when it comes to your preference for butter, crisco, or lard in pie crusts, but do you ever wonder where the flour you use to roll out your perfect dough comes from, or how it might affect the quality of your pie? How would emmer pasta taste? What kind of home baked bread would locally grown spelt flour produce? In this edition of Greenmarket’s quarterly panel discussion series, The Educated Eater, talk turns to regionally grown grain. Hear from a culinary historian, a grower, a miller, a baker, and a chef about the past, present, and future of grains grown in the Northeast. Greenmarket’s June Russell moderates a discussion that explores the challenges and developments that will advance the availability and volume of local grains to the bakers, brewers, distillers, and chefs in our area.

Panelists:

Nathan Leamy—Watson Fellow, home baker, and global grains expert
Don Lewis—Miller and Baker, Wild Hive Farm
Anton Earnhardt—Grower, Lightning Tree Farm
Michael Anthony—Chef, Gramercy Tavern
June Russell, moderator—Farm Inspections Manager, Greenmarket

Wednesday, November 17, 6:30-8:30pm
Media, Advocacy, and Dialogue
Anna-Maria and Stephen Kellen Gallery
66 Fifth Avenue at 13th Street

Increasing media attention to urban agriculture has mirrored the public’s growing interest in the topic. At the same time, food activists have used the media in creative ways to advance support for urban agriculture. Moderated by food writer Andy Smith, this panel focuses on the relationship between media, advocacy, and the urban agriculture movement. The panel includes an artist and filmmaker, the producer of an internet broadcast network focusing on urban farming, an organizer of a farm boot camp for urban chefs, an expert on the internet and agriculture, and the publisher of a food magazineAndy Smith moderates this panel that includes Ian Cheney, Erin Fairbanks, Tom Grace, Katy Keiffer, and Gabrielle Langholtz.

Wednesday, November 17, 6-9pm
Family-style Beer Dinner at Inside Park at St. Bart’s
109 E. 50th St.
Tickets, $55

Join Edible Manhattan for a 3-course family-style beer dinner at Inside Park at St. Bart’s featuring Stella Artois, Leffe and Hoegaarden beers. This collaborative dinner will feature 3 courses served family-style throughout the dining room, each inspired by a different film from the good folks at the NYC Food Film Festival, including “Mr. Okra”, “The Perfect Oyster”, and “Buttermilk: It Can Help”. Inside Park Dinner, of course, will be paired with the evening’s films: Chef Matthew Weingarten will serve wood-roasted oysters and an okra and housemade sausage jambalaya. And there will be veggies a plenty–also in honor of “Mr. Okra”–and “a buttermilk something” to finish. NYC Food Film Festival director George Motz, as well as Edible editor Brian Halweil, will be on hand to introduce the meal. All guests will also receive a one-year subscription to Edible Manhattan.

Wednesday, November 17, 6-9pm
Queens Eats
The Foundry
42-38 9th St., Long Island City
Tickets, $30 tasting, or $50 tasting with open bar

The Queens Harvest Food Co-op hosts a tasting of event showcasing dishes from some of Queens’ finest: Agnanti, Astor Bake Shop, Bareburger, Cream Bakery, De Mole, LIC Market, M. Wells, Sage Testaccio, Vesta, and more.

Saturday, November 202pm-4pm
Bread Baking with Ancient Wheat
The Brooklyn Kitchen: 100 Frost St.
Admission, $40 – tickets available here

Join Eli Rogosa on a culinary journey through the history of wheat from einkorn domesticated in Mesopotamia and emmer used in the original matzah, to the evolution of wheat in early Europe. Participants will bake sourdough einkorn bagels made with einkorn malt, einkorn flatbread spiced with Jerusalem zataar, and sprouted einkorn bread.

Saturday, November 20
Giving Thanks Dinner with Eagle St. Rooftop Farm

The Brooklyn Kitchen
100 Frost St., Williamsburg
Tickets, $65

Give thanks to the hands that fed us all season long with produce from the Eagle Street Rooftop Farm. Join friends and fellow farmers at this harvest meal and thanks giving party hosted by the Brooklyn Kitchen.

Sunday, November 21, 11am-1pm
Pancake Breakfast at New Amsterdam Market
New Amsterdam Market
South St. between Beekman St. and Peck Slip
Admission, $20 per plate

We’ll be flipping flapjacks on Sunday morning, at the culmination of a very grainy week—join us for pancakes, grits, and sausage as the sun comes up over the East River. Sample buckwheat, spelt, and good old fashioned (white and whole wheat) pancakes with a helping of local cornmeal grits on the side. Breakfast sausage and maple syrup sweeten the deal. All proceeds benefit New Amsterdam Market, the Organic Growers’ Research and Information-sharing Network, and The Heritage Wheat Conservancy.

Dear Local Gourmands,

Happy Election Day! While I hope you’re all carrying out your civic duties, I wanted to call your attention to a few local projects that could use your help and input as well. Just over a week ago my friend Hector’s farm suffered a devastating fire that wiped out an estimated $12,000 worth of agricultural products, supplies, and equipment. You may know Hector from his stand at the Fort Greene Greenmarket, or his CSA which has been providing farm shares in Bed-Stuy for years. Click here to make a donation to help Conuco Farm rebuild. Secondly, Added Value, the famed Red Hook Community Farm, was nearly wiped out in the height of their harvest season by that crazy hale storm three weeks back. Make a reservation to dine at The Good Fork this Wednesday, and be sure to ask for the ‘Added Value Dinner’– proceeds will benefit this extraordinary community gathering ground.

Be well,
Jeanne

Tuesday, November 2, 7-9pm
Book Launch Party and Tasting Event for The Essential New York Times Cookbook and In the Kitchen With a Good Appetite
Chelsea Market

Tickets, $50
New York Times writers Amanda Hesser and Melissa Clark team up for a joint book launch event celebrating 20 of the city’s best chefs. Each chef will prepare delectable bite-size nibbles of their favorite New York Times recipe, while Sixpoint Craft Ales, Russ & Daughters, and Cienfuegos will quench your thirst with beer, egg creams, and good ol’ fashioned punch. Proceeds will benefit the Wellness In The Schools program, a New York City community based organization that works to improve the environment, nutrition, and fitness in NYC public schools.

Wednesday, November 3
The Good Fork Celebrates Added Value
391 Van Brunt Street, Red Hook, Brooklyn
$75 per person

An long-time supporter of Red Hook’s community farm, Added Value, the Good Fork serves a four-course dinner to help raise funds to aid recovery from a devastating mid-October hale storm. Call 718 -643-6636 to make reservations, and ask for the ‘Added Value Dinner.’

Wednesday, November 3, 6:30-8:30pm
Creative Action and Everyday Urban Agriculture
Anna-Maria and Stephen Kellen Gallery

66 Fifth Avenue at 13th St
Urban agriculture in the United States, as panelist Domenic Vitiello has written, takes the form of everyday urbanism, “largely disconnected from the world of professional design.” The role of creative action in urban agriculture practices is explored by an urban historian, anthropologist, architect, and two artists. What does it mean for individuals in communities engaged in creative practice to reconnect to their food, neighbors, and environment through urban agriculture? What is the significance of the resulting physical engagement with place that growing food requires?

Laura B. DeLind has a joint appointment in the Department of Anthropology and the Residential College in the Arts and Humanities at MSU. She is co-founder of the Lansing Urban Farm Project. The Lansing Urban Farm Project (LUFP) here.

Jean Gardner is Associate Professor of Social-Ecological History and Design at the School of Constructed Environments, Parsons.

Eve Mosher is an artist who makes large-scale public projects to investigate and increase knowledge and understanding of environmental and social issues. Website here.

Domenic Vitiello is a professor of city planning at the University of Pennsylvania and is founding president of the Philadelphia Orchard Project. The Philadelphia Orchard Project here.

Thursday, November 4, 4-6pm
Back into the Kitchen: The Rekindling of America’s Home Fires
Elmer Holmes Bobst Library, Third Fl.
70 Washington Square South
rsvp.bobst@nyu.edu
Suggested donation, $10

From DIY butchery to home cheese making, pulling freshness from a rooftop Great Recession Victory Garden to gathering for Farmers Market – canning classes – Americans of all ages seem to be storming back into the home kitchen with renewed intensity and focus. Cookbook sales are up even while recipe sharing blogs go viral. Something big is going on out there in the American Home Kitchen.
Join food historian Andy Smith, nutrition/public health/food studies professor and sociologist Marion Nestle and New York Times food reporter Julia Moskin – moderated by food and restaurant consultant Clark Wolf - as they dig in to what’s up and what’s cooking.

Saturday, November 6, 1-4pm
Chowder Cook-off at Jimmy’s No. 43
43 E. 7th St.
Tickets, $20 at the door
Fifteen amateur cooks throw down their best chowder recipes to benefit the Northwest Atlantic Marine Alliance, an organization dedicated to protecting the marine environment and the fishing communities that rely on it for their livelihoods.

Saturday, November 6, 1pm
Growing Soil: Healthy Soil Cultivation and Irrigation Tips for Better Crops
La Finca Del Sur/Harlem & Bronx Farm
138th St and Grand Concourse
646-453-9657

Are your garden beds sometimes hard to work? Do big clods or hard pans develop on your soil surface? Ever wonder why your plants not growing as well as they did the year before? These conditions might have to do with how you manage your soil and how you irrigate. Come to this workshop to learn valuable cultivation and irrigation tips from Just Food trainers Karen Washington and Molly Culver. You can prepare your beds at just the right moisture level – this is important for healthy soil and healthy, abundant crops.

Sunday, November 7, 2pm
Healthy But Good: Eat Your Greens
The Greene Space
44 Charlton St.
Tickets, $20

Greens are packed with vitamins, nutrients and fiber—and often pushed aside by picky eaters.  This program will be sure to change the pickiest of eaters into leafy greens lovers!  Leonard Lopate is joined by farmer Fred Lee of Sang Lee Farms on Long Island, Grace Young, chef and author of Stir-Frying to the Sky’s Edge, Cathy Erway, intrepid blogger Cathy Erway of Lunch at Sixpoint and Not Eating Out in New York, and King Phojanakong, chef of Kuma Inn to dive into the world of plant diversity and explore international cuisine.
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Of note a few weeks down the road…

Monday, November 8, 7pm
Agri+Culture (aka Fermentation and Civilization): Cheese

The Greene Space
44 Charlton St.
Tickets, $25

Before refrigeration, we had fermentation, which utilizes micro-organisms to preserve food. Without it, we wouldn’t have pickles, bread, beer, cheese, or many other common foods.  Leonard Lopate and his guests will explore the unique relationship between dairy farmers and cheese makers, and learn how to make cheese at home. Panelists include Anne Saxelby, founder and co-owner of NYC cheese shop Saxelby Cheesemongers, Michael Lee, cheese maker at Twig Farm, Bennett Konesni, an expert in field workers’ songs, and Keith McNally, owner of Cafe Luxembourg, Pravda, Balthazar, and Minetta Tavern, among other restaurants.

Tuesday, November 9, 7pm
Faces of Farming: the Chicken or the Egg
The Greene Space
44 Charlton St.
Tickets, $25

Leonard Lopate hosts a lively discussion about small-scale farmers raising chickens for eggs. Among the most compact and low-maintenance of all livestock, chickens are at home in both rural areas and in cities all over the world. Chicken farming, particularly on the micro-level (backyard and urban) has experienced a tremendous surge in popularity.  We’ll meet some chickens, hear about adventures in urban chicken-keeping, and of course, taste delicious local eggs.

Wednesday, November 10, 6:30-8:30pm
Innovations in Urban Agriculture
Anna-Maria and Stephen Kellen Gallery,
Sheila C. Johnson Design Center
2 West 13th St
Free 

This panel consists of creative agricultural entrepreneurs who are designing integrated composting, aquaculture, and vegetable growing systems, aggregated networks of backyard gardens, rooftop farms, and hydroponic growing systems on contaminated industrial sites.  John Ameroso, an expert on urban agriculture who has advised urban farmers for more than three decades as Cornell’s extension agent in New York City, moderates a panel discussion on the possibilities of these innovative forms of urban agriculture practices. Speakers include Erika Allen, Ben Flanner, Stacey Murphy, and mary Seton Corboy.

Saturday, November 13, 9:30pm
The Farmer and the Horse
The Tank
354 W. 45th St.
Tickets, $10 at the door or on thefarmerandthehorse.com

Catch the New York City premiere of The Farmer and the Horse, a documentary that follows three young farmers as they learn to farm with giant draft horses instead of tractors. Award-winning journalist Jared Flesher presents The Farmer and the Horse, a new film that digs into difficult questions about sustainability, self-sufficiency, and why we do the work we do. Flesher’s film goes beyond the usual platitudes of smiling organic farmers talking about the good life. Farming is grueling work and it’s hard to make a living — especially if you don’t use a tractor.

Saturday, November 13, 6-10pm
Innaugural Hattie Carthan Farmy Folks Soiree Fundraiser
Clifton Pl. at Marcy Ave. (next to the Hattie Carthan Garden)
Tickets, $25

Yonnette Flemming, matriarch of of the Hattie Carthan community garden and market, cooks up a fall harvest feast for “farmy folks.” Food, films, and music will make for a lively family event, which will also honor those who have helped the garden become a positive center of community spirit.

Dear Local Gourmands, 

This weekend Carlo Petrini, founder of Slow Food, visited the Union Square Greenmarket, and although I didn’t have a chance to speak with him personally, I did witness some of the farmers I most admire shake his hand and share meaningful words about why they do what they do. I was touched watching them express their own humble admiration and it  made me appreciate the way in which our collective food movement is evolving. But the momentum of this very movement felt all but slow when I awoke the next morning to the Food Issue of the Times magazine, which pegged the moment we’re living through in food history perfectly.  I read the magazine cover to cover, racing through the stories, the overarching theme of which were the new communities that have sprung up around a common appreciation for good food. These are communities whose members take care of each other (The Catch), riff off each other (Recipe Redux: The Community Cookbook), and most necessarily feed each other (The 36-hour Dinner). I like to think of Local Gourmands both as a bulletin board for the food community I’ve come to know in New York City, as well as a record of its growth– evidenced by the fact that there are now so many happenings featuring local food each week that it’s as unlikely for any reader to be able to make it to everything listed as it is for me to send this note out on time at the beginning of the week. That said, this coming weekend I’ll forgo this little writing exercise to work on my pie crust technique: Greenmarket is hosting a pie bake off to raise funds to send a delegation of farmers to Terre Madre. I hope to see you there– either with your blue ribbon best, or just an empty stomach. Details below.

All best,
Jeanne

Tuesday, October 12, 6pm
The Complete Mushroom Hunter: A Lecture and Workshop with Gary Lincoff
The Horticultural Society of New York
148 West 37th Street, 13th Floor
RSVP required:
Tickets, $10 (members) $25 (non-members)

Author Gary Lincoff presents an illustrated lecture on his new book, The Complete Mushroom Hunter: An Illustrated Guide to Finding, Harvesting, and Enjoying Wild Mushrooms, inviting readers to connect with a hobby that will enrich their understanding of the natural world. Lincoff escorts the reader from the mushroom’s earliest culinary awakening, through getting started and equipped for mushroom forays, to preparing and serving the fruits of the foray, wherever you live. A workshop on how to create your own mushroom spore print follows the lecture.

Thursday, October 14, 6pm
Food Justice: A New Social Movement Takes Root
Wollman Hall, Eugene Lang Building
65 West 11th Street, 5th floor (enter at 66 West 12th Street)
Free

In conjunction with New School’s Living Concrete/Carrot City exhibition, professor Robert Gottlieb, director of the Urban and Environmental Policy Institute at Occidental College, discusses the increasing disconnect between food and and the rising resistance movement. He is the author of a dozen books, including most recently Food Justice (with Anupama Joshi, MIT Press) and a long-time social/environmental activist and historian of social movements.

Friday, October 15, 5-10pm
October BBQ at Queens County Farm
73-50 Little Neck Parkway
Floral Park, NY
Tickets, $40

Queens Farm gives the grill one last go for the season at this autumnal barbecue. Make merry around the fireplace in the farm’s historic Adriance farmhouse while noshing on Queens Farm sausages and Brooklyn Brewery beer.

Friday, October 15, 7-9pm
FEAST Feast
Art Directors Club
106 W. 29th St.
Tickets, $20-$60

With the goal of bringing together changemakers from across industries to have a conversation about good food while breaking bread together, the evening will include exploration around innovative new models for food entrepreneurship like the Greenpoint food market incubator, keynote speeches by leading thinkers, and conversations with vendors and farmers. Hosted in the Art Director’s Club of New York, the evening will feature a farm to table dinner by guest chefs, supper clubs, and vendors that celebrate and exemplify the spirit and energy of the city’s burgeoning food movement.

Saturday, October 16, 10am-5pm
Added Value Harvest Fest

Red Hook Community Farm
580 Columbia Street, Red Hook
Whether it’s raining, or shining, come celebrate the harvest bounty at Added Value this Saturday with kids activities, pumpkin carving, food from the Good Fork, iCi, Rice, Kevin’s and the Brooklyn Lobster Pound. Draw inspiration from cooking demos, then pick up some produce to take home for a farm-sourced fall dinner.

Saturday, October 16, 1-3pm
Terre Madre Pie Bake Off
Jimmy’s No. 43
43 E. 7th St.

Tickets, $10
Whether you like to eat ‘em or bake ‘em, fall is a great season for pie. Make your way to this pie party and bake-off at Jimmy’s No. 43 to help raise funds to send a local delegation of regional farmers and local food advocates to Terra Madre, Slow Food’s international consortium of food producers, cooks, advocates, and students. Sweet and savory entries welcome, and extra points for any baker who incorporates New York State flour into his or her crust. Whether or not rolling out a perfect crust stops you cold in the kitchen, every one is welcome to cast a vote for best in show. If you’d like to bring your blue ribbon winner in for the judges to try, e-mail lcarollo@greenmarket.grownyc.org to sign up.

Saturday, October 16, 6-8:30pm
Second Annual Hummus Cook off
Brooklyn Fireproof
119 Ingraham St (at Porter Ave)

For the second year, this cook-off honors Craig Murphey, a true-blue hummus lover. Enter your best bean dip and help raise funds for the NYC Coalition Against Hunger Craig Murchey Fellowship Fund. Info on entries and prizes here.

Sunday, October 17, 11am-4:30pm
Tenth Annual New York International Pickle Day
Broome St., btwn Essex and Ludlow
Pucker up, it’s time for New York International Pickle Day! Sample sours, learn how to make your own, and even take home some pickle compost from Annie Hauck-Lawson. From kapusta to kimchi to Kosher dills, Pickle Day is one of the best ways to taste the culinary diversity and history of New York City, a town practically founded on fermentation.
___________________________________
Of note a few weeks down the road…

Monday, October 18, 6pm
Meet the 2010 Harvest Award Winners at a public forum in Manhattan
92YTRIBECA
200 Hudson Street
Hear from this year’s Glynwood Harvest Award winners, and learn how they have created innovative models to support their local food systems, and how others can use these ideas to further the movement in more communities. To reserve your place, email harvestawards@glynwood.org; a confirmation will be sent to you. 

Tuesday, October 19, 6:30pm
Heirloom Seeds and Heritage Breeds: How Our Agricultural Past Informs the Way We Eat Today and A Tribute to Betty Fussell: Indefatigable Cook, Writer, Researcher, and Culinary Trailblazer
Culinary Historians of New York
Tickets, $40 non-members and guests, $25 CHNY members, $22 CHNY students and senior members
Culinary history is being re-lived today as the seeds and breeds of yesteryear are appearing in farmers’ markets and gardens around the country.  How is our agricultural past shaping the way we are eating today?  What is the future of heirloom seeds and heritage breeds in the modern agricultural landscape?  What lessons have been learned from large-scale commercial agriculture?  Join the discussion about foods that are once again sprouting up around the country. Panelists include Patrick Martins, Founder of Slow Food USA and co-founder of Heritage Foods; Diane Ott Whealy, Co-founder and Vice President of Education of the Seed Savers Exchange; and Judith LaBelle, President, Glynwood. Karin Endy, Chair of The Culinary Trust and owner of Edible Resources, moderates.

Wednesday, October 27, 7:30pm
Harvest Time Dinner Benefit for Auto High
Egg
Tickets, $65

Egg hosts the third annual Harvest Time in Schools benefit dinner to raise funds for Automotive High School in Brooklyn. Now in its fourth year, The Harvest Time at Auto High program includes an organic edible garden, a cooking program, trips to local farms, and the course ‘Food, Land, and YOU,” which introduces students to current debates about food policy and helps the learn the true story about what they eat. Auto High students will help plan, harvest, plate, and serve dinner and will talk with guests about their learning experiences with the program.

Tuesday, November 2, 7-9pm
Book Launch Party and Tasting Event for The Essential New York Times Cookbook and In the Kitchen With a Good Appetite
Chelsea Market

Tickets, $50
New York Times writers Amanda Hesser and Melissa Clark team up for a joint book launch event celebrating 20 of the city’s best chefs. Each chef will prepare delectable bite-size nibbles of their favorite New York Times recipe, while Sixpoint Craft Ales, Russ & Daughters, and Cienfuegos will quench your thirst with beer, egg creams, and good ol’ fashioned punch. Proceeds will benefit the Wellness In The Schools program, a New York City community based organization that works to improve the environment, nutrition, and fitness in NYC public schools.

Local Gourmands 9/13/10-9/19/10

Dear Local Gourmands,

Last week I got a call from Beth Linskey of Beth’s Farm Kitchen who was on the road going farm to farm on Long Island and then back yard to back yard all over Williamsburg foraging for figs to make jam. I was bowled over by her earnest dedication to find these fruits and nearly left my desk at work right then to follow along on her jam-driven journey. On Tuesday night she’ll join a panel at the Brooklyn Kitchen discussing how to start a small food business and scale it up at a sustainable pace while sourcing locally the entire time. Following the talk Beth will lead the audience in a jam and chutney making demo. For her demo, she’ll be using plums, but if you are lucky enough to be one of those city residents with a stray fruit tree growing in your backyard (or even if it belongs to your neighbor and you have to sneak over to pick in the middle of the night), her enthusiasm will surely send you straight to your own kitchen to get crackin’ on preserving the fall harvest.

Jam on,
Jeanne

Tuesday, September 14, 6:30-9pm
Educated Eater: Regional Processing from Strawberry Fields to Strawberry Jam
The Brooklyn Kitchen
100 Frost St., Williamsburg
Tickets, $45

From strawberry fields to jars of jam, preserves, or even flash-frozen fruit to eat all winter, the transformation of local crops into value-added products offers a number of opportunities for regional farmers and small food entrepreneurs alike. Listen to this esteemed panel of Greenmarket participants and peers as they explore the possibilities that processing presents, upstate and down. If ever you dreamed of starting your own small food company, this panel will offer plenty of info on how to secure a commercial kitchen space, the proper licensing you’ll need, and how to scale up your operation sustainably. The discussion will be followed by a jam making demo with Beth Linskey and Liz Beals of Greenmarket’s Beth’s Farm Kitchen. Each audience member will take home a jar of Beth’s locally sourced preserves.

Wednesday, September 15, 5-9pm
Farewell, Summer Dinner at Queens Farm
73-50 Little Neck Parkway
Floral Park, NY

Tickets, $80
Before the tomatoes give way to hearty root vegetables, spend the evening at the city’s oldest working farm enjoying the waning summer warmth and bounty of fresh produce. Tamara Reynolds prepares a farm-sourced supper of pork, vegetables, eggs, and honey.

Wednesday, September 15, 7:30pm
Eat This Film! Sweetgrass
92Y Tribeca
200 Hudson St at Canal

Tickets, $12
Featuring gorgeous cinematography and immersive storytelling, Lucien Castaing-Taylor and Ilisa Barbash’s spellbinding documentary follows a flock of sheep on a their last trek through Montana’s dangerous Beartooth Mountains for summer pasture. Following the film, the directors will join Greenmarket sheep farmer Eugene Wyatt from Catskill Merino Sheep Farm to discuss the film and shed light on raising (and filming) sheep.

Thursday, September 16, 6:30-8:30pm
Slow U: Breaking Bread with Three Women Who Know Their Dough
iCi
Tickets, $25-$35

Join author Lynne Christy Anderson, author of Breaking Bread: Recipes and Stories from Immigrant Kitchens, as she, Hot Bread Kitchen’s Jessamyn Waldman, and Greenmarket’s June Russell, discuss transplanting traditional, old-country recipes to a new land. Tastes of Jessamyn’s bread will be served with New York State wines and American artisan and farmstead cheese.

Thursday, September 16
Let Us Eat Local
South St. Seaport Water Taxi Beach
Tickets

Just Food’s annual benefit honors local food advocates journalist Mark Bittman, CSA farmer Cheryl Rogowski, urban farmer Yonnette Fleming. Enjoy food and drink by locally-minded city chefs, a special purple haze Sixpoint brew made with Red Jacket Orchards plums, and give a little to Just Food, who gives the city a lot by matching communities with CSAs from regional farms.

Saturday and Sunday, September 18 & 19, 10am-2pm; 2-6pm
Farm City Tour
Tickets, $35-$45

Two tours per day: pickup at 10am and 2pm sharp at Atlantic Terminal (Flatbush at the corner of Atlantic). Tour ends at Old Stone House, 234 4th St, Park Slope “The Farm City Tour charts an annotated journey through sites practicing innovative approaches to urban agriculture in Brooklyn. Using a 28 seat bus running on Compressed Natural Gas (CNG), the cleanest burning fuel, there will be opportunities at each stop for workshops and tastings. The tour will provide a view of diverse practices in urban farming such as beekeeping, composting, caring for laying hens, rainwater harvesting and more. The tour will end at Old Stone House in Brooklyn, one of the last surviving structures from the Borough’s agricultural past, where there will be a display of small scale and provocative urban farming projects, such as Truck Farm by filmmakers Ian Cheney and Curtis Ellis (King Corn); Nanofarming by Bryony Romer; and Seeding the City by Eve Mosher. Other sites on the tour may include Red Hook Community Farm; Carlton Brooklyn Bear Garden, Eagle Street Rooftop Farm and others. At the final destination, guests will be served foods from the toured farms prepared by Communal Table along with an opportunity to make and jar of  farm-fresh pickles as a souvenir.”

Sunday, September 19, 2-4pm
Sowing the Future
Hawthorne Valley Farm

Ghent, NY
Hawthorne Valley and The Nature Institute invite the public to join in hand-sowing a field of winter wheat and learning about small grains and the evolution of agriculture in Columbia County. Steffen Schneider, Hawthorne Valley Farm General Manager, and Craig Holdrege, Director of The Nature Institute, will discuss the physical form and evolution of seeds, as well as the cultural and economic implications of a changing seed and seed industry. Displays prepared by The Nature Institute and Hawthorne Valley Farmscape Ecology Program will provide participants with an opportunity to sift through various grain varieties and to explore the role of grains in the development and history of Columbia County. The afternoon will culminate as farmers and participants alike walk a field together, sowing seeds of wheat. Sturdy shoes are recommended and participants are asked to bring a mug for refreshments and a hat to fill with seeds. All are invited to participate. Visit http://www.HawthorneValleyFarm.org or call 518-672-7500 x 105 for more information.
________________________________
Of note a few weeks down the road…

Monday, September 20, 7pm
City-wide Honey Tasting
Beer Table

427 B 7th Ave.
(Btwn 14th & 15th Sts)

Tickets, $35 (e-mail events@beertable.com for tickets)
Join Annie Novak of Eagle Street Rooftop Farm and other city beekeepers for a city-wide honey tasting. Taste the unique characteristics of different neighborhoods based on the trees and blooms in each, and hear how the bees and their keepers fared since it’s become legal again in NYC.

Tuesday, September 21, noon
The New York City Climate for Food Enterprise:
A talk and tour of the Entrepreneur Space, a kitchen incubator in Long Island City
Food Systems Network
The Entrepreneur Space
36-46 37th St., Queens
Suggested donation, $5

Join Food Systems network for a guided tour through Katherine Gregory’s incubator kitchen in LIC, the Entrepreneur Space. If you have a small food enterprise and are looking to scale up your operation, this full-fledged incubator might be just the next step you need to take to make it happen. For more information, contact kristin@foodsystemsnyc.org.

Tuesday, September 21, 6:30pm
New Food, Old Foodways: A panel discussion with
Noah Bernamoff, Shamus Jones, and Jane Ziegelman
The Tenement Museum
108 Orchard St.

Proprietors of Bierkraft, Mile End, and Brooklyn Brine join Jane Ziegelman, author of 97 Orchard: An Edible History to discuss the ways in which many of the “new” food trends apparent in today’s city dining scene are reflections of old New York foodways.

Thursday, September 23
The Art of Farming
Sotheby’s
1334 York Ave.

Sotheby’s hosts gallery talks, a cocktail hour, and a gala dinner in conjunction with an heirloom vegetable auction to raise funds for GrowNYC’s New Farmer Development Project and The Sylvia Center at Katchki Farm. This first-of-its-kind event will celebrate edible heirlooms and the art involved in their creation. Beets are on the block, as are a number of other fine food and agricultural experiences.

Thursday, September 23, 6:30pm
Life Line of New York: How the High Line Fed New York City
Chelsea Market Passage
Free

“Before it was transformed into a park, the High Line played a critical role in delivering food to New Yorkers. Listen to historian Patrick Ciccone tell the rich–and often overlooked–story of how food reached New Yorkers, and how the High Line connected the city to a nationwide network of food production and processing.”

Saturday & Sunday, September 25 &26, 1-4pm
The Bike Brooklyn Beer Blitz!
$25 per person per tour, includes one beer at Matt Torrey’s Bar, mid-tour
RSVP: Matt@levysuniqueny.com for starting location
BYO bike and helmet to this three-hour tour of former brewery buildings through Williamsburg, East Williamsburg, and Bushwick which were the most densely packed brewing neighborhoods, back in 1890. See historical photographs of various brewery buildings when they were built, between the 1880s and 1920s, compare them with vintage 1970s photos (in the heart of Bushwick’s deep dark arson-and-gangs era) and observe them as they stand today, re-purposed but obviously the same brewery buildings. German Churches, banks and social halls will also be scoped out.  The tour will end at Evergreen Cemetery on the Brooklyn/Queens border, where many of the Brewers are buried. Tune your bike up ahead of time at Brooklyn Bike and Board and receive a 10% discount on your tuneup AND a $5 discount on your Bike Brooklyn Beer Blitz Ticket. Tell ‘em “Bike Brooklyn Beer Blitz!” and buy your BBBB ticket right at the shop! Matt Torrey’s Bar will provide our mid-tour & post-tour beers at happy hour prices, and to partake in the Brooklyn Brewerysponsorship, you’ll have to take the tour!

Sunday, September 26
7th Annual Ray Bradley Farm Festival
New Paltz, NY
Tickets, $10 (free for kids)

If you know and love Ray Bradley’s farm from your weekly shopping routine at the 97th St. or Grand Army Plaza Greenmarkets, follow him back up to the farm on Sunday for the 7th annual Ray Bradley Farm Festival. There will be farm-sourced BBQ aplenty, hay rides, “Chicken-sh*t” BINGO, a Succah in the field in honor of the harvest, and one lucky ticket holder will win his or her weight in tomatoes!

Monday, September 26-Wednesday, October 6
Eat Drink Local Week

This state-wide promotion of New York’s local bounty is a collaboration of all Edible magazines in the Empire State, and involves partners from the entire food chain, including restaurants, wine shops and wineries, breweries and beer bars, farms and food artisans, and cultural institutions that celebrate food.

Tuesday, September 28, 7pm
Hungry Filmmakers
Anthology Film Archives
32 2nd Ave.
Tickets, $15

Hungry Filmmakers returns to Anthology Film Archives with a new roster of food-centric shorts. As always, a discussion with the filmmakers will follow the screening. Nicole Taylor of Heritage Radio Network’s show Hot Grease moderates. Beer, wine, and hors d’oeuvres served in the lobby following the program.

Films:
Blue Gold: World Water Wars by Sam Bozzo
Queen of the Sun by Taggart Siegel
The Texas Huntress by Ashley Chiles
Starved for Attention by Jeremiah Zagar and Jeremy Yachts
Soul Food Junkies by Byron Hurt

Saturday, October 2, 11:30am-4:30pm
Pig Island
Governors Island
Tickets, $75-$85

A dozen chefs from some of New York City’s finest venues show off their “whole hog know-how,” serving up pig sourced from local farms The Piggery, Violet Hill, and others. Taste what Sara Jenkins of Porchetta, Jacques Gautier of Palo Santo, Michael Jenkins of Butter, and the barbecue masters Hoppin’ John Taylor of Low Country and Sam Barbieri of the Fuhgeddaboutit BBQ Team bring to the table. Sixpoint will tap a limited-release pilsner, a seasonal pumpkin saison, and Signal, a lightly smoked pale ale. A portion of the proceeds will benefit Food Systems Network New York.

Saturday, October 2, 11am
Brooklyn by Bike: Explore the Old BK Water Supply System
Tickets, $10

Manhattan Borough Historian Michael Miscione will lead a bicycle tour of the now-defunct water supply system that served the once-independent City of Brooklyn. The system, built in the 19th century, brought fresh water from Queens and Long Island into the city. It was largely abandoned after Brooklyn was consolidated into New York City in 1898, and its components– pipes, reservoirs, pumping stations, wells, etc.– were dismantled, build over or repurposed. But some remnants and ruins still exist, and can be seen if you know where to look.

Monday, October 4, 7pm
Beans and Grains with Cayuga Pure Organics
Beer Table
427 B 7th Ave., btwn 14th & 15th
Tickets, $35 (e-mail events@beertable.com for tickets) 

What better time than early October for a meet and greet with Cayuga Pure Organics, New York state’s only certified organic growers’ collective of dry beans, whole grains, and milled flour? There will be how-to’s on preparing their products, a talk with CPO’s Tycho Dan about the Ithaca grower’s cooperative, as well as tastings provided and beers paired.

Wednesday, October 6, 6-10pm
Taste of Greenmarket
135 W. 18th St.
Tickets, $175

Taste of Greenmarket, the city’s premiere tasting of local food with thirty of the city’s finest chefs and mixologists, features market-inspired dishes and seasonal cocktails in celebration of the season’s harvest. Mingle with the likes of Dan Barber, April Bloomfield, Michael Anthony, Julie Reiner and numerous other local food luminaries as the fête of the fall spotlights the incredible flavors and talent that comprise New York City’s “Greenmarket cuisine.” Proceeds support Greenmarket’s Youth Education Project which connects thousands of New York City schoolchildren in grades K-12 with Greenmarkets, farmers, and chefs each year.

Local Gourmands 9/6/10-9/12/10

Dear Local Gourmands,

The first pie I ever made was entered in the Blue Hill Fair’s annual blueberry pie contest. I didn’t taste it before it was placed on the table for the panel of judges to ponder the flakiness of the crust or the texture of the filling, I just watched from the sidelines, frozen with anxiety, part of me certain that I would win and be declared Maine’s pie prodigy (I was only 11), the other part of me certain someone would spit out my creation on the spot. Neither of these scenarios played out, but I have made few pies since– that same sense of anxiety seems to manifest itself in my crust every time I try to give this American classic another shot: the dough crumbles, tears, sticks, and fails again and again. I favor cobblers simply to sidestep my short comings in the pastry department. But on Labor Day, the last day of summer, I found myself longing for a jumble berry pie. With nothing else to do on a rare lazy afternoon, I cut up a stick of frozen butter and fed the cubes into a food processor with flour, salt, and sugar, blending the mix until it resembled cornmeal. The first batch was blended too long and had to be thrown out, but I persevered and tried again, and then a third time to make enough dough for a lattice crust. Maybe it was Mark Bittman’s soothing, steadfast instructions, or just the right room temperature, but my disk of dough rolled out beautifully, and I felt like I’d cracked the code. This time the panel of judges was just a group of friends who agreed that the balance of berries, juice, and butter smacked of summer itself.

All best,
Jeanne

Thursday, September 9, 7:30-10pm
Peconic Pearl Oysters
Jimmy’s No. 43
43 East 7th St.
Tickets, $35

Slow Food NYC welcomes Karen Rivara who runs the only commercial shellfish hatchery in the Peconic estuary. With 800 oysters in the house, the evening will take the form of a “shuck and talk” with Karen informing guests about her role as an oyster producer in the preservation of the Long Island Sound.

Sunday, September 12, 11am-4pm
New Amsterdam Market
South Street btwn Beekman Street and Peck Slip

Starting this Sunday, the thoughtfully curated New Amsterdam Market picks up a weekly rotation, which means we’ll be able to get our Bent Spoon ice cream fix that much more often.

September 12-25
Farm City: where are you growing?

This multi-sensory celebration of New York’s many urban farming initiatives includes a country fair in Brooklyn, film screenings, urban ag tours, and a “last supper” among many other happenings that draw attention to the intersection of art and lifestyle. See a full list of Farm City events here.

Sunday, September 12, 11am–5pm
Farm City Fair

The Invisible Dog Art Center
51 Bergen St.

“The fair is a wild, new take on the traditional county fair, a daylong celebration of art and food grown in Brooklyn! Festivities engage all the senses: hear live music performed by local Bang on a Can marching band Asphalt Orchestra; taste delicacies prepared by local chefs inspired by ingredients from Brooklyn farms; view specially commissioned work exploring the culture of agriculture by local artists; get a feel for materials needed to produce your own food in workshops by Brooklyn Food Coalition; participate in a blue ribbon competition hosted by GreenThumb; and browse a marketplace with some of Brooklyn’s small-batch artisanal food purveyors, curated by Greenpoint Food Market. Cap it off with The Food Experiments’ live cooking competition — Brooklyn Roots — featuring savory samples and refreshing drinks from Brooklyn Brewery, Six Points Brewery, Red Hook Wines, Brooklyn Oenology, Kings County Distillery, and others.”

Sunday, September 12, noon-3pm
Good Food Fest
Myrtle Ave. btwn Vanderbilt and Clinton Ave.

Bring a dish, meet your neighbors, swap recipes, and enter the Best Dish Contest at this Ft. Greene/Clinton Hill neighborhood food fest. Cooking, canning, and beekeeping demos, plus a 12-piece brass band to get the party going. Enter your best homemade dish and see how it shores up in the following categories: tastiest dish (it’s all about flavor), greenest dish (keep it local and organic), healthiest dish (nutritious and delicious), and biggest dish (most food to share with others).
__________________________________
Of note a few weeks down the road…

Tuesday, September 14, 6:30-9pm
Educated Eater: Regional Processing from Strawberry Fields to Strawberry Jam
The Brooklyn Kitchen
100 Frost St., Williamsburg
Tickets, $45

From strawberry fields to jars of jam, preserves, or even flash-frozen fruit to eat all winter, the transformation of local crops into value-added products offers a number of opportunities for regional farmers and small food entrepreneurs alike. Listen to this esteemed panel of Greenmarket participants and peers as they explore the possibilities that processing presents, upstate and down. The discussion will be followed by a jam making demo with Beth Linskey and Liz Beals of Greenmarket’s Beth’s Farm Kitchen. Each audience member will take home a jar of Beth’s locally sourced preserves.

Thursday, September 16, 6:30-8:30pm
Slow U: Breaking Bread with Three Women Who Know Their Dough
iCi
Tickets, $25-$35

Join author Lynne Christy Anderson, author of Breaking Bread: Recipes and Stories from Immigrant Kitchens, as she, Hot Bread Kitchen’s Jessamyn Waldman, and Greenmarket’s June Russell, discuss transplanting traditional, old-country recipes to a new land. Tastes of Jessamyn’s bread will be served with New York State wines and American artisan and farmstead cheese.

Thursday, September 16
Let Us Eat Local
South St. Seaport Water Taxi Beach
Tickets

Just Food’s annual benefit honors local food advocates journalist Mark Bittman, CSA farmer Cheryl Rogowski, urban farmer Yonnette Fleming. Enjoy food and drink by locally-minded city chefs, a special purple haze Sixpoint brew made with Red Jacket Orchards plums, and give a little to Just Food, who gives the city a lot by matching communities with CSAs from regional farms.

Saturday and Sunday, September 18 & 19, 10am-2pm; 2-6pm
Farm City Tour
Tickets, $35-$45

Two tours per day: pickup at 10am and 2pm sharp at Atlantic Terminal (Flatbush at the corner of Atlantic). Tour ends at Old Stone House, 234 4th St, Park Slope
“The Farm City Tour charts an annotated journey through sites practicing innovative approaches to urban agriculture in Brooklyn. Using a 28 seat bus running on Compressed Natural Gas (CNG), the cleanest burning fuel, there will be opportunities at each stop for workshops and tastings. The tour will provide a view of diverse practices in urban farming such as beekeeping, composting, caring for laying hens, rainwater harvesting and more. The tour will end at Old Stone House in Brooklyn, one of the last surviving structures from the Borough’s agricultural past, where there will be a display of small scale and provocative urban farming projects, such as Truck Farm by filmmakers Ian Cheney and Curtis Ellis (King Corn); Nanofarming by Bryony Romer; and Seeding the City by Eve Mosher. Other sites on the tour may include Red Hook Community Farm; Carlton Brooklyn Bear Garden, Eagle Street Rooftop Farm and others. At the final destination, guests will be served foods from the toured farms prepared by Communal Table along with an opportunity to make and jar of  farm-fresh pickles as a souvenir.”

Thursday, September 23
The Art of Farming
Sotheby’s
1334 York Ave.

Sotheby’s hosts gallery talks, a cocktail hour, and a gala dinner in conjunction with an heirloom vegetable auction to raise funds for GrowNYC’s New Farmer Development Project and The Sylvia Center at Katchki Farm. This first-of-its-kind event will celebrate edible heirlooms and the art involved in their creation. Beets are on the block, as are a number of other fine food and agricultural experiences.

Thursday, September 23, 6:30pm
Life Line of New York: How the High Line Fed New York City
Chelsea Market Passage
Free

“Before it was transformed into a park, the High Line played a critical role in delivering food to New Yorkers. Listen to historian Patrick Ciccone tell the rich–and often overlooked–story of how food reached New Yorkers, and how the High Line connected the city to a nationwide network of food production and processing.”

Monday, September 26-Wednesday, October 6
Eat, Drink, Local Week
This state-wide promotion of New York’s local bounty is a collaboration of all Edible magazines in the Empire State, and involves partners from the entire food chain, including restaurants, wine shops and wineries, breweries and beer bars, farms and food artisans, and cultural institutions that celebrate food.

Saturday, October 2, 11:30am-4:30pm
Pig Island
Governors Island

A dozen chefs from some of New York City’s finest venues along with an impressive cast of food experts and personalities are expected to dazzle the crowd with their “whole hog know-how”. All participants will work with locally sourced ingredients, including whole pigs purchased directly from farms, such as Violet Hill Farm and The Piggery. The talent includes Sara Jenkins of Porchetta, Jacques Gautier from Palo Santo, “Chopped” champion Michael Jenkins from Butter Restaurant, along with other barbecue masters such as Hoppin’ John Taylor of Low Country cooking fame and Sam Barbieri with the award-winning Fuhgeddaboutit BBQ Team.
Sixpoint Craft Ales will have a limited-release Pilsner, a seasonal Pumpkin Saison, and the popular Signal, a lightly smoked pale for sale during the length of the event. A charitable donation will be made to the Food Systems Network NYC.

Saturday, October 2, 11am
Brooklyn by Bike: Explore the Old BK Water Supply System
Tickets, $10

Michael Miscione, the Manhattan Borough Historian, will lead a bicycle tour of the now-defunct water supply system that served the once-independent City of Brooklyn. The system, built in the 19th century, brought fresh water from Queens and Long Island into the city. It was largely abandoned after Brooklyn was consolidated into New York City in 1898, and its components — pipes, reservoirs, pumping stations, wells, etc. — were dismantled, built over or repurposed. But some remnants and ruins still exist, and can be seen if you know where to look.

Wednesday, October 6, 6-10pm
Taste of Greenmarket
135 W. 18th St.
Tickets, $175

Taste of Greenmarket, the city’s premiere tasting of local food with 30 of the city’s finest chefs and mixologists, features market-inspired dishes and seasonal cocktails in celebration of the season’s harvest. Mingle with the likes of Dan Barber, April Bloomfield, Michael Anthony, Julie Reiner and numerous other local food luminaries as the fête of the fall spotlights the incredible flavors and talent that comprise New York City’s “Greenmarket cuisine.” Proceeds support Greenmarket’s Youth Education Project which connects thousands of New York City schoolchildren in grades K-12 with Greenmarkets, farmers, and chefs each year.

Dear Local Gourmands,

Growing up on the coast of Maine, my parents couldn’t understand why I resisted bites from their treasured baskets of fried clams. I don’t think I liked eating something unrecognizable, or maybe it was that they were too chewy– I much preferred stealing the cup of tarter sauce that accompanied each basket and dipping my French fries in it instead. Maybe I just didn’t like the clams because I was skeptical of where they had come from. This weekend a friend invited me to Fire Island to go clam digging. We wrestled with the tide, dragging a contraption that looks like a combination of a basket and a rake across the floor of the bay. Resting the handle of the contraption on your shoulder you can hear the prongs scraping through the sand. When you hit a clam there’s a thunk, and you know you’ve got one. Or at least that’s what they told me. I came up empty handed. Luckily my host caught eight, fat, purple-shelled beauties, which he then steamed open in butter, shallots, and flat leaf parsley with a bit of white wine. He tossed them with pasta and served a late, late lunch on the deck as the sun set. Our catch was wonderfully briny, and totally addictive, which means I better get my clam digging technique down pat, and quick before the summer is over.

All best,
Jeanne

Monday, August 16, 7:30-10pm
Brewmasters Reserve Release Party: Explosions in the Park
The Prospect Park Boat House
Tickets, $20
An explosive summer garden party announces the latest brewmasters reserve release by Brooklyn Brewery: Detonation Ale.
Be the first to taste Detonation, enjoy other tried and true Brewery favorites as well as food from The Meathook and dumplings from The Dump School. All ticket proceeds benefit The Prospect Park Alliance.

Monday, August 16, 7-8pm
Beer and Ice Cream Social
Beer Table
427b 7th Ave., Park Slope
Tickets, $35

New Jersey native and Bent Spoon ice cream maker/co-owner Gabrielle Carbone will make her way to Park Slope to co-host the first Beer Table ice cream social! Hailing from Princeton NJ, the Bent Spoon has gotten quite a following thanks to its stellar ice cream and use of seasonal ingredients from the area’s farms and producers. Gabrielle and a NJ grower will give a small glimpse into the rich agricultural landscape of the southern Garden State. Four flavors will be served along with beer pairings. Email events@beertable.com to reserve your bar stool.

Wednesday, August 17, 7-11:30pm
Local Cheese and Cider Tasting
Jimmy’s No. 43
43 E. 7th St.
Amy Thompson of Lucy’s Whey pairs artisanal American cheese with the finest ferments from Farnum Hill Ciders of Lebanon, New Hampshire. If ever you long for the dry cider served in English pubs, this is your chance to try our best domestic counterpart.

Thursday, August 19, 6pm
Green Screen Film Series Presents: Sweetgrass
Horticultural Society of New York
148 West 37th St., 13th fl
Tickets, $5 (Hort members), $10 (general public)
Hort members $5; non-members $10

“A paean to the Old West, Sweetgrass captures modern cowboys’ overland journey, wrangling thousands of sheep, as they move across Montana’s Absaroka-Beartooth Mountains, amid sweepingly dramatic vistas and endless skies. Ronnie Scheib in Variety describes the film as “a mad cross between Howard Hawks’s RED RIVER” and an anthropological account of vanishing nomadic traditions, with “a dash of Tex Avery’s DRAG-ALONG DROOPY.” Twenty-first century cowboys call their mothers on cell phones and complain about rainy weather, ornery sheep and exhausted horses. A strikingly beautiful film, SWEETGRASS is at once funny, awe-inspiring and endearing. At first the passive, fuzzy sheep seem utterly adorable; over time we come to understand the exasperated cowboy who screams profanities at this sea of stubborn, bleating beasts over which he struggles to reign.” RSVP to gpisegna@hsny.org or call (212) 757-0915 x115 for tickets.

Saturday, August 21, 6-10pm
Summer BBQ: with Fatty ‘cue
Good Company
10 Hope St., Williamsburg
Plate of ‘cue, $5

In these dog days of summer it’s nice to have a few last hurrahs to look forward to. All summer Greg and Darin Bresnitz of Dinner with the Band, have been curating inspired barbecues in the patio of Good Company on Hope St. in Williamsburg. If you haven’t made it yet, you better plan on getting there early to load up on Fatty ‘cue’s Southeast Asian interpretation of the wood smoke American barbecue technique. Punches DJs, heating up the dance floor with disco vibes to keep you moving.

Sunday, August 22, 11am-4pm
New Amsterdam Market: Ice Cream Fair and Tomato Tasting
South Street between Beekman Street and Peck Slip
Celebrate the height of summer with some of the region’s best artisanal ice cream created with local products to showcase the local flavor. Catch cones by The Bent Spoon, Roberta’s, Early Bird Cookery, Marlow & Daughters, MilkMade Ice Cream, and Van Leeuwen Artisan Ice Cream. Each presenting producer will create up to three unique ice creams and sorbets for the market using only seasonal or responsibly sourced ingredients. If you have a hard time choosing, buy a $20 ice cream sampler ticket, good for six miniature cones. The drips might make your hands sticky, but the proceeds will benefit the market.

From noon to 4pm on the same day, Food Systems Network New York stages its annual tomato tasting at the market. “Taste and compare a dazzling array of dead ripe tomatoes at their peak of flavor, savor tomato dishes and virgin cocktail sips by tomato chefs, including FSNYC members Jorge Collazo (SchoolFood), Meg Grace (The Redhead), Mary Cleaver (The Cleaver Company), and others.” Purchase tickets now!

Sunday, August 22, 2-3pm
Eagle St. Rooftop Farm Lecture:
Grow it, Cook it with the Van Leeuwens
Spend this late summer day volunteering on the rooftop farm from 9am-4pm, or stop through to visit the farm market at any point to pick up some produce for your Sunday supper. At 2pm the Van Leeuwens (who have gained a serious following in the streets of New York for their locally sourced ice cream) speak about their former life as cooks in Bali. Learn about cooking global cuisine with local produce, and when you tire of weeding, their famous yellow pushcart will be down below on Eagle St. as a one-time special treat.
________________________________

Of note a few weeks down the road…

Monday, August 23, 7pm
Jam Making with Anarchy in a Jar
Beer Table
427b 7th Ave., Park Slope
Tickets, $50

Get your jam on with Laena McCarthy from Anarchy in a Jar. Our favorite “jamstress” will demonstrate simple ways to make preserves and offer other ideas for stocking up your larder. Each attendee will take a jar of jam home with them and will receive two beers during the session. Please emailevents@beertable.com for reservations.

Monday, August 23, 7pm-1am

Pop-up Taqueria: Black and Cream
East River Patio, under the Williamsburg Bridge
97 S. 6th St. btwn Bedford and Berry
RSVP: www.foodsexart.com
$8/plate

Tacos filled with local black beans, topped with freshly made cheese, pickled produce, and greens grown on the city’s rooftops make a one-time appearance at this pop-up party under the Williamsburg bridge. Nosh on Mast Brothers chocolate and while you dance the night away to the tunes of Alex Pasternak.

Wednesday, August 25, 7-11pm
BBQ with The Franks and Andrew W.K.
Good Company
10 Hope St., Williamsburg
Plate of ‘cue, $5
The final Finger on the Pulse barbecue of the summer rounds out the season with plates by the Franks of Frankies Sputino and tunes by the infamous Andrew W.K.

Thursday, September 9, 7:30-10pm
Peconic Pearl Oysters
Jimmy’s No. 43
43 East 7th St.
Tickets, $35

Slow Food NYC welcomes Karen Rivara who runs the only commercial shellfish hatchery in the Peconic estuary. With 800 oysters in the house, the evening will take the form of a “shuck and talk” with Karen informing guests about her role as an oyster producer in the preservation of the Long Island Sound.

September 12, 11am–5pm
Farm City Fair

The Invisible Dog Art Center
51 Bergen St.

“The fair is a wild, new take on the traditional county fair, a daylong celebration of art and food grown in Brooklyn! Festivities engage all the senses: hear live music performed by local Bang on a Can marching band Asphalt Orchestra; taste delicacies prepared by local chefs inspired by ingredients from Brooklyn farms; view specially commissioned work exploring the culture of agriculture by local artists; get a feel for materials needed to produce your own food in workshops by Brooklyn Food Coalition; participate in a blue ribbon competition hosted by GreenThumb; and browse a marketplace with some of Brooklyn’s small-batch artisanal food purveyors, curated by Greenpoint Food Market. Cap it off with The Food Experiments’ live cooking competition — Brooklyn Roots — featuring savory samples and refreshing drinks from Brooklyn Brewery, Six Points Brewery, Red Hook Wines, Brooklyn Oenology, Kings County Distillery, and others.”

Participants include:

Asphalt Orchestra, Brooklyn-based, 12-piece, next-generation, avant-garde marching band, will open the event on Bergen Street and in the neighborhood between 11 a.m. and noon.
Andrew Casner, compost painter, demonstrates his acclaimed, agrarian work — the community process of developing a viable compost with an acid-etched canvas underneath created as a natural by-product.
Mathilde Roussel-Giraudy, a Brooklyn-based artist, presents Ça pousse! (It’s growing!), human-form sculptures made from material such as wheatgrass that change as they grow.
Miwa Koizumi, Brooklyn-based ice cream maker of “NY Flavors,” will create a geographically inspired new ice cream flavor based on Bergen Street and the festival.
Tattfoo Tan, the vibrant urban farming visionary artist, launches his new bike-based S.O.S Mobile Classroom as the next installment in his two-year-long public art project titled S.O.S. (Sustainable. Organic. Stewardship.).
Wylie Dufresne, renowned chef of wd-50, creates a new downloadable recipe based on reimagining local ingredients, to be sampled at the fair.
Christina Kelly, Brooklyn-based artist meditates on loss and possibility, growing blue corn in monumental street planters in a public art project called Maize Field, located where Lenape Indians planted in the 1600s.

Events and activities throughout the day: 
Farmstands from Brooklyn farms such as Added Value, Rooftop Farms, and Bk Farmyards will sell their produce and explain its provenance.
GreenThumb will host a Premium Blue Ribbon Contest for gardeners to show off their produce and reveal the range of possibilities for home growing in the city.
Brooklyn Food Coalition will present a daylong series of workshops on how to make or grow food at home, from canning to under-counter compost.
Greenpoint Food Market will curate the best of Brooklyn’s small-batch vendors, including Anarchy in a Jar preserves and Brooklyn Kombucha.
The Food Experiments, created by Theodore Peck and Nick Suarez, will select competitive chefs to respond to their Brooklyn roots, using one or more ingredients grown or made in Brooklyn in a cook-off.
A Bar of Brooklyn Brews, Wines, and Cocktails will offer Brooklyn-made libations during the fair.
Chefs from The Meat Hook, Marlowe & Sons, Ted & Honey, Egg and otherswill serve up delicious eats made in Brooklyn in collaboration with urban farms.

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